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I was having a play around with converting JSON strings to and from POJOs. And I wondered whether it would be best have a new class definition for different types of json. As I assumed that having google gson having to parse null fields would slow it down.(not noticeably, but still. I thought it was worth the experiment and post here.) For example logging a client in might be.

public class CustomJSON {
    private String name;

    public String getName() { return name; }
    public void setName(String name) { this.name = name; }
}

But I could have other things to recieve from the client such as. favourite color, food ect.

public class CommonJSON {
    private String name;
    private String food;
    private String music;

    //getters and setters.
}

So I ran the test.

CustomJson is the same as above and with CommonJSON I added 50 other null fields that would be unused a to ax.

public class CommonJSON {
    private String name;
    private String a;
          ...
    private String ax;

    //getters and setters.
}

My main method for running the test is as follows.

public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub


        String theJSON = "";

        int passes = 100;
        long start;
        long finish;
        long exeTime;

        Gson gson = new Gson();

        //custom JSON
        start = System.nanoTime();
        for(int i=0;i<passes;i++)
        {
            CustomJSON custom = new CustomJSON();
            custom.setName("StackOverFlow");            
            theJSON = gson.toJson(custom);
        }
        finish = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(theJSON);
        exeTime = finish-start;
        System.out.println("Custom JSON \n\t>\t "+(exeTime)+" Nano seconds");
        System.out.println(" \t>\t "+Math.round((exeTime)/1000000.0)+" Micro seconds\n");

    //common JSON
    start= System.nanoTime();
    for(int i=0;i<passes;i++)
    {
        CommonJSON toClientJSONd = new CommonJSON();
        toClientJSONd.setName("StackOverFlow");
        theJSON = gson.toJson(toClientJSONd);
    }
    finish = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(theJSON);
    exeTime = finish-start;
    System.out.println("Common JSON \n\t>\t "+(exeTime)+" Nano seconds");
    System.out.println(" \t>\t "+Math.round((exeTime)/1000000.0)+" Micro seconds");

}

The results are not as I expected. With 100 passes the common class finishes 10ms faster on my machine. If I increase the number of passes the common class eventually starts to lag behind.

What makes the common class faster to start of with? Should I worry about this in my code or just use one class for a common class for all jsons?

I can provide full source and an eclipse project if anyone would like to run it.

share|improve this question
    
The problem is your testing method, not the code (see the answer below). Also, you can simply tell Gson not to serialize null fields. –  Brian Roach Jan 18 '13 at 14:40
    
I tried that and it didn't speed it up at all. :/ –  Andrew Jan 18 '13 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You seem to be experiencing the effects of the JVM warming up. See this SO post for more info.

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To answer the other part of my question. For Simple JSON objects its neater to use the JsonObject from the GSON lib and add properties.

JsonObject json = new JsonObject();
json.addProperty("myBool", false);
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