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I was trying to write a templated base class to store a fixed number of data types, each with varying length. Here is a simplified version of much what I was trying to do:

template< int NINT, int NR0 >
class EncapsulatedObjectBase
{
   public:

  EncapsulatedObjectBase();

  ~EncapsulatedObjectBase();

  double m_real[NR0];
  int m_int[NINT];
}

Yeah...so the template parameters can be zero, thus declaring a zero-length array of objects. There will be multiple derived classes for this base, each defining their own number of variables. I have two questions:

1) Is this approach fundamentally flawed?

2) If so...why doesn't icc13 or gcc4.7.2 give me warnings about this when I instantiate a zero-length array? For gcc I use -wall and -wextra -wabi. The lack of warnings made me think that this sort of thing was OK.

EDIT:

Here is the contents of a file that show what I am talking about:

#include <iostream>

template< int NINT, int NR0 >
class EncapsulatedObjectBase
{
public:
  EncapsulatedObjectBase(){}
  ~EncapsulatedObjectBase(){}

  double m_real[NR0];
  int m_int[NINT];
};


class DerivedDataObject1 : public EncapsulatedObjectBase<2,0>
{
   public:

   DerivedDataObject1(){}

  ~DerivedDataObject1(){}

  inline int& intvar1() { return this->m_int[0]; }
  inline int& intvar2() { return this->m_int[1]; }

};


class DerivedDataObject2 : public EncapsulatedObjectBase<0,2>
{
   public:

   DerivedDataObject2(){}

  ~DerivedDataObject2(){}

  inline double& realvar1() { return this->m_real[0]; }
  inline double& realvar2() { return this->m_real[1]; }
};




int main()
{
   DerivedDataObject1 obj1;
   DerivedDataObject2 obj2;

   obj1.intvar1() = 12;
   obj1.intvar2() = 5;

   obj2.realvar1() = 1.0e5;
   obj2.realvar2() = 1.0e6;

   std::cout<<"obj1.intvar1()  = "<<obj1.intvar1()<<std::endl;
   std::cout<<"obj1.intvar2()  = "<<obj1.intvar2()<<std::endl;
   std::cout<<"obj2.realvar1() = "<<obj2.realvar1()<<std::endl;
   std::cout<<"obj2.realvar2() = "<<obj2.realvar2()<<std::endl;


}

If I compile this with "g++ -Wall -Wextra -Wabi main.cpp" I get no warnings. I have to use the -pedantic flag to get warnings. So I still don't know how unsafe this is. In retrospect, I feel as though it must not be a very good idea...although it would be pretty useful if I could get away with it.

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What compiler and version are you using? gcc 4.7.2 complains about the zero-length array. –  Praetorian Jan 18 '13 at 0:57
    
@Praetorian: gcc 4.7.2. I think that it might have something to do with the template? –  doc07b5 Jan 18 '13 at 1:04
1  
Warning? It is an error to define a 0-sized array –  K-ballo Jan 18 '13 at 1:08
    
@doc07b5: So, what exactly are you compiling? In my experiments GCC 4.7.2 generates errors (in -pedantic-errors mode) when trying to instantiate this template with zeros as arguments. –  AndreyT Jan 18 '13 at 1:10
1  
@K-ballo: the standard never requires an error. An implementation is permitted to accept code that fails to conform to syntactic constraints, provided that it "diagnoses" the error. The meaning of the code is up to the implementation. A warning is an acceptable diagnostic as far as the standard is concerned, and that's why you need -pedantic-errors to tell gcc to reject certain ill-formed constructs. –  Steve Jessop Jan 18 '13 at 1:15
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Zero-sized arrays are actually illegal in C++:

[C++11: 8.3.4/1]: [..] If the constant-expression (5.19) is present, it shall be an integral constant expression and its value shall be greater than zero. The constant expression specifies the bound of (number of elements in) the array. If the value of the constant expression is N, the array has N elements numbered 0 to N-1, and the type of the identifier of D is “derived-declarator-type-list array of N T”. [..]

For this reason, your class template cannot be instantiated with arguments 0,0 in GCC 4.1.2 nor in GCC 4.7.2 with reasonable flags:

template< int NINT, int NR0 >
class EncapsulatedObjectBase
{
   public:

  EncapsulatedObjectBase();

  ~EncapsulatedObjectBase();

  double m_real[NR0];
  int m_int[NINT];
};

int main()
{
   EncapsulatedObjectBase<0,0> obj;
}

t.cpp: In instantiation of 'EncapsulatedObjectBase<0, 0>':
t.cpp:17: instantiated from here
Line 10: error: ISO C++ forbids zero-size array
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

clang 3.2 says:

source.cpp:10:17: warning: zero size arrays are an extension [-Wzero-length-array]

(Note that, in any case, you won't get any error until you do try to instantiate such a class.)

So, is it a good idea? No, not really. I'd recommend prohibiting instantiation for your class template when either argument is 0. I'd also look at why you want to have zero-length arrays and consider adjusting your design.

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1  
It is illegal, but it can be instantiated with G++'s default options (as your own liveworkspace output shows.) You should be clear that when you say "reasonable flags" you're referring to -pedantic-errors -Wfatal-errors, which many people consider unreasonable for general use. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 18 '13 at 1:32
1  
@Lightness Races in Orbit: Thanks for the advice. The design is a little "fast and loose". –  doc07b5 Jan 18 '13 at 2:25
    
@JonathanWakely: I don't consider any combination of flags that permits illegal code to be "reasonable". That's my definition. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 2:38
    
So for example you won't use long long in C++03 code? That seems a bit ... pedantic. Not to mention impractical in plenty of real world code. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 18 '13 at 9:05
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: it's your definition, but it's not the standard's definition of conformance, so you have to expect that people won't understand what you mean by "reasonable" unless you elaborate :-) Note that -pedantic-errors does not achieve the goal that one might hope for, of accepting only code that all conforming implementations accept (i.e. "checking your code is portable"). For example, it accepts int test_array[9 - CHAR_BIT];, which is non-portable because it relies on an implementation-defined quantity. –  Steve Jessop Jan 18 '13 at 10:52
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In C using a zero-sized array as the last member of a struct is actually legal and is commonly used when the struct is going to end up with some sort of dynamically-created inline data that's not known at compile-time. In other words, I might have something like

struct MyData {
    size_t size;
    char data[0];
};

struct MyData *newData(size_t size) {
    struct MyData *myData = (struct MyData *)malloc(sizeof(struct MyData) + size);
    myData->size = size;
    bzero(myData->data, size);
    return myData;
}

and now the myData->data field can be accessed as a pointer to the dynamically-sized data

That said, I don't know how applicable this technique is to C++. But it's probably fine as long as you never subclass your class.

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Isn't it more common to create an array member of size 1 for the struct hack? –  Praetorian Jan 18 '13 at 0:57
1  
@KevinBallard There's nothing preventing UB from working :-) –  Praetorian Jan 18 '13 at 1:00
1  
Hrm, it turns out that -pedantic causes warnings about zero-length arrays, in both Clang and GCC 4.7.2, but without that, they both accept it silently. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 18 '13 at 1:06
2  
Btw, C99 introduces "flexible array members" as the sanctioned way to do this, defined in 6.7.2.1/16. It does something that a size-1 array doesn't do, which is to explicitly state in the standard that you're allowed to index off the end of the array provided that you don't exceed the memory actually allocated. This indexing was supported by compiler-writers (it would take effort not to support it, given how array indexing is implemented in practice), but whether C89 strictly speaking guaranteed that it worked was the kind of thing language lawyers love to angst over. –  Steve Jessop Jan 18 '13 at 1:08
2  
@doc07b5: Alternatively if you don't like using -pedantic, you could provide a template specialization for NINT = 0 and do something there. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 18 '13 at 1:56
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1) Add to declaration of your class C++11 static_assert or BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT and you will have compile-time diagnostic for zero length array:

....
   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(NR0 > 0);
   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(NINT > 0);
   double m_real[NR0];
   int m_int[NINT];
};

2) Use std::array or boost::array and you will have run-time diagnostic (in debug mode) for index overflow problem in such code:

   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(NR0 > 0);
   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(NINT > 0);
   boost::array<double, NR> m_real;   //double m_real[NR0];
   boost::array<int, NINT> m_int;     //int m_int[NINT];
};

Remark: class boost::array has specialisation for zero-size array

3) Use size_t but not int for size of array.

Your design is quite dangerous:

   DerivedDataObject1 a;
   a.m_real[2] = 1;   // size of m_real == 0 !!!

I think it will better to change design of your class EncapsulatedObjectBase. May be it will better to use:

   template<typename T, size_t N> class EncapsulatedObjectBase
   {
    ....
   };
   class DerivedDataObject1 : public EncapsulatedObjectBase<int,2>
   {
     ....
   };
   class DerivedDataObject2 : public EncapsulatedObjectBase<double,2>
   {
     ....
   };
   class DerivedDataObject3 : public EncapsulatedObjectBase<double,2>
                            , public EncapsulatedObjectBase<int,2>
   {
     ....
   };
share|improve this answer
1  
There is no std::static_assert. It's a keyword. –  Pubby Jan 18 '13 at 2:43
    
@Pubby. You are right. I correct it. –  SergV Jan 18 '13 at 2:55
    
There is no C11++. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 3:48
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Can you explain what do you mean? link –  SergV Jan 18 '13 at 3:58
    
@SergV: That's C++11. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 4:01
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