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Is there some way to check if an arbitrary PID is running or alive on the system, using Node.js? Assume that the Node.js script has the appropriate permissions to read /proc or the Windows equivalent.

This could be done either synchronously:

if (isAlive(pid)) { //do stuff }

Or asynchronously:

getProcessStatus(pid, function(status) {
    if (status === "alive") { //do stuff }
}

Note that I'm hoping to find a solution for this that works with an arbitrary system PID , not just the PID of a running Node.js process.

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

I needed to check for running pid's in a project as well. I took this answer of using kill -0 <PID> and wrapped it up in a module called is-running https://npmjs.org/package/is-running

npm install is-running

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+1 Doesn't spawn a child for killing. Just a question though, why do you require the module exec in your index.js? – hexacyanide Apr 3 '13 at 14:47
    
exec is left over from a previous version. It should go away – Noah Apr 3 '13 at 17:04
2  
Does it work on Windows ? – Amber de Black Feb 4 '15 at 16:05
    
It does work on Windows. – 1j01 Sep 9 '15 at 14:48

Seems like you can call process.kill(pid, 0) and wrap it up in a try/catch.

http://nodejs.org/api/process.html#process_process_kill_pid_signal - "Will throw an error if target does not exist, and as a special case, a signal of 0 can be used to test for the existence of a process."

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I'm not an expert here, but could you not spawn a child process to check the status with a command line tool?

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