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I have an assignment/project to write a program that displays the integers between 1 and 100 that are divisible by 6 or 7, but not both. It does not work the way I've written it below. Is my boolean value correct for what the question is asking?

import acm program.*;

public class SixAndSeven extends ConsoleProgram {
    public void run() {
        for (int n = 1; n < 100; n++) {
            boolean year = (n % 6 ==0) ||
                (n % 7 ==0) &&
                !(n % 6 == 0) &&
                ( n % 7 ==0);

             if (year) {
                 println(year);
             }
        }
    }
}
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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, ElYusubov, brian d foy, dreamcrash, 0x499602D2 Jan 18 '13 at 4:16

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If it doesn't work, then no, it's not correct ;) –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 18 '13 at 1:20
    
To be more helpful, you should edit your program to display the value of each of your boolean terms for the values that don't give the correct answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 18 '13 at 1:21
    
I think you'll want to print n instead of the boolean year. Also you probably want to change the second half to !((n % 6 == 0) && (n % 7 == 0)) –  user1333371 Jan 18 '13 at 1:22
    
@user1333371 yes thanks that was a typo –  Jessica M. Jan 18 '13 at 2:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should do the below

boolean year = ((n % 6 ==0) || (n % 7 ==0)) && !((n % 6 == 0) && ( n % 7 ==0));

Basically group the 2 sets of conditions within a () before negating, so that the conditions apply correctly to both.

To make it more readable, you could do this.. (though perhaps overkill..)

boolean divisbleby6 = n%6 == 0;
boolean divisbleby7 = n%7 == 0;
boolean divisibleby6and7 = divisbleby6 && divisbleby7 ;

boolean year = (divisbleby6 || divisbleby7) && !divisibleby6and7 ;

or the clever method suggested by Mel (possibly harder to understand at a glance), which returns true only if one but not both conditions are true.

boolean year = divisbleby6 != divisbleby7;

P.S. Additionally, as user1333371 suggests, you probably want to do println(n);

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I did not notice that thanks. –  Jessica M. Jan 18 '13 at 1:24
    
+1. Consider using boolean mod6 = (n%6==0); mod7 = (mod7%==0); so you don't need to redo work. It also allow you to return mod6 != mod7 which is cute. –  Mel Nicholson Jan 18 '13 at 1:26
    
I really would not recommend using boolean x = divisbleby6 != divisbleby7; It took me a long time to figure out what that was doing. That's very clever code, and I don't mean that as a compliment. –  tieTYT Jan 18 '13 at 2:19
1  
@DanielKaplan true, have added the caveat. –  Karthik T Jan 18 '13 at 2:24
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You can simply write like below:

boolean year = (n % 6 == 0) != (n % 7 == 0)
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Or use XOR instead of not-equals. Best answer. –  EJP Jan 18 '13 at 3:00
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Use parenthesis to set the order of operations and make sure the negation applies to the modulo check for both 6 and 7.

import acm program.*;

public class SixAndSeven extends ConsoleProgram {
public void run(){

for (int n = 1; n < 100; n++) {

boolean year = ((n % 6 == 0) || (n % 7 == 0))
                    && !((n % 6 == 0) && (n % 7 == 0));

            if (year) {
                System.out.println(n);
            }

}
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