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Given the following two strings:

Dim str1() As String = {"123", "456", "789", "0"}
Dim str2() As String = {"123", "456", "1"}

How do I perform a full outer join of str1 and str2 and end up having a structure like this:

{Nothing, "1"}
{"0", Nothing}
{"123", "123"}
{"456", "456"}
{"789", Nothing}

Based on several discussions on SO and other websites, I tried using LINQ:

Dim v = From a In str1 Join b In str2 On a Equals b Group By a Into g = Group
        From o In g.DefaultIfEmpty()

But it does not produce the desired result, which is exactly the same as this (regular INNER JOIN):

Dim v = From a In str1 Join b In str2 On a Equals b

The last example I've been looking at is here (C#).

And here is Another article, but it seems too complicated to be the shortest possible solution (I've seen much more simple C# examples and hope VB can be as efficient).

Why this question is useful

For example, one can have a file structure, where file path is a key. By doing full outer join of the keys, you can compare folders, find which files are missing on which side and show difference to the user. Any kind of synchronization task could use this approach.

share|improve this question
    
Why this question may be inapplicable: In some cases the two sets are sorted, e.g. many file systems will return filenames in alphabetical order. In that case it is more efficient to walk through both lists comparing one element from each and handling mismatches as you go rather than trying every possible pairing. –  HABO Jan 18 '13 at 1:37
    
@HABO: You are right, IO.Directory.GetFiles returns files in alphabetical order. Where it still can be useful is post-processing, for example, you don't need all files, and just pre-selected ones. So you would call GetFileInfo only on 5% of the files you are interested in. Anyway, I think LINQ should internally sort items and then perform a join, regardless of the input. I'd be surprised, if it does not do that. –  Neolisk Jan 18 '13 at 1:45
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess this is not the solution you desire, however it seems to fullfil the task:

string[] a1 = { "123", "456", "1" };
string[] a2 = { "123", "456", "789", "0" };

var intersection = a1.Intersect(a2); //get the intersection
var exceptions1 = a1.Except(a2);     //get items from a1, that are not in a2
var exceptions2 = a2.Except(a1);     //get items from a2, that are not in a1

var result = new List<Tuple<string, string>>(); //the result set
result.AddRange(intersection.Select(s => new Tuple<string, string>(s, s)));
result.AddRange(exceptions1.Select(s => new Tuple<string, string>(s, null)));
result.AddRange(exceptions2.Select(s => new Tuple<string, string>(null, s)));

foreach (var t in result)
{
    Console.WriteLine((t.Item1 ?? "null") + "\t" + (t.Item2 ?? "null"));
}

The output is:

123     123
456     456
1       null
null    789
null    0
share|improve this answer
    
So basically, you do INNER JOIN, OUTER LEFT JOIN, OUTER RIGHT JOIN and later combine them together? Yeah, I suppose that's a valid workaround. +1 –  Neolisk Jan 18 '13 at 1:48
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You can use the HashSet, specifically the IntersectWith and SymmetricExceptWith methods.

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Can you give an example? –  Neolisk Jan 18 '13 at 1:39
    
yeah, but it ends up looking almost exactly like @Konstantin Vasilcov's answer; except with HashSets instead of LINQ –  Gus Jan 18 '13 at 1:56
    
Okay, now I got your point. Yes, hashset should certainly perform better for big data. Thanks for mentioning it. +1 –  Neolisk Jan 18 '13 at 2:04
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Alright this answer isn't really any functionally different than Konstantin's but it is smaller in space.

What I did was perform the outer join on both arrays into tuples and unioned the two IEnumerables.

var str1 = new string[] { "123", "456", "789", "0" };
var str2 = new string[] { "123", "456", "1" };

var unionedsets = (from a in str1 join b in str2 on a equals b into grp from g in grp.DefaultIfEmpty()
            select new Tuple<string, string>(a, g)).Union(
            from b in str2 join a in str1 on b equals a into grp from g in grp.DefaultIfEmpty()
                select new Tuple<string,string>(g,b));

The only reason it looks so compact is because I smooshed (that's a technical term right?) the LINQ statements together. Unsmooshed, the code looks like this:

var jstr1 = from a in str1
            join b in str2 on a equals b
            into grp
            from g in grp.DefaultIfEmpty()
            select new
            Tuple<string, string>(a, g);
var jstr2 = from b in str2
            join a in str1 on b equals a
            into grp
            from g in grp.DefaultIfEmpty()
            select new
            Tuple<string,string>(g,b);

var unionedjoin = jstr1.Union(jstr2);

Is this closer to what you were looking for?

share|improve this answer
    
Very close. But could you please convert to VB.NET? My main issue was using INTO statement in VB.NET for this purpose. –  Neolisk Jan 18 '13 at 12:26
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