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With Java Grammar for ANTLR, I could read a java code and print out the tokens sequentially.

    String filePath = JAVA_SOURCE;
    String input = readFileAsString(filePath);
    //ANTLRStringStream in = new ANTLRStringStream(input);
    InputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream(filePath);
    ANTLRInputStream in = new ANTLRInputStream(inputStream);
    Java6Lex lexer = new Java6Lex(in);
    CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);
    while(true) {
        int val = tokens.LA(1);
        tokens.consume();

        if (val == -1) {
            break;
        }
        System.out.printf("%d ", val);
    }

59 54 38 54 81 61 92 59 54 38 54 96 61 92 59 54 38 54 81 54 92 90 54 92 ...

How can I map each tokens back to the position in the JAVA_SOURCE? Does ANTLR have a counter or something?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By default, ANTLR produces CommonTokens. Read the full API here: http://www.antlr.org/api/Java/org/antlr/runtime/CommonToken.html

Here's a demo to print some information about the tokens the Java6 parser encounters:

  • merge the lexer and parser rules in a single file called Java6.g (and name the grammar "Java6", of course!)
  • copy the file antlr-3.3-complete.jar in the same folder as Java6.g

Copy-paste the following in your Java6.g file:

grammar Java6;

// options ...

@parser::members{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String source = "package test;\n\npublic class Test {\n\n  int n = 42;\n}\n";
    Java6Lexer lexer = new Java6Lexer(new ANTLRStringStream(source));
    Java6Parser parser = new Java6Parser(new CommonTokenStream(lexer));
    System.out.println(source);
    parser.dumpTokens();
  }
}

dumpTokens
  :  (
       t=. {
         CommonToken ct = (CommonToken)t;
         System.out.printf("type=\%s, text='\%s', line=\%d, startIndex=\%d, charPositionInLine=\%d\n", 
                            tokenNames[ct.getType()], 
                            ct.getText(), 
                            ct.getLine(), 
                            ct.getStartIndex(), 
                            ct.getCharPositionInLine());
       }
     )* 
     EOF
  ;

// the rest of the grammar rules are not changed

Now run the Java6 file:

java -cp antlr-3.3-complete.jar org.antlr.Tool Java6.g
javac -cp antlr-3.3-complete.jar *.java
java -cp .:antlr-3.3-complete.jar Java6Parser

and you will see the following being printed to your console:

package test;

public class Test {

  int n = 42;
}

type=PACKAGE, text='package', line=1, startIndex=0, charPositionInLine=0
type=IDENTIFIER, text='test', line=1, startIndex=8, charPositionInLine=8
type=SEMI, text=';', line=1, startIndex=12, charPositionInLine=12
type=PUBLIC, text='public', line=3, startIndex=15, charPositionInLine=0
type=CLASS, text='class', line=3, startIndex=22, charPositionInLine=7
type=IDENTIFIER, text='Test', line=3, startIndex=28, charPositionInLine=13
type=LBRACE, text='{', line=3, startIndex=33, charPositionInLine=18
type=INT, text='int', line=5, startIndex=38, charPositionInLine=2
type=IDENTIFIER, text='n', line=5, startIndex=42, charPositionInLine=6
type=EQ, text='=', line=5, startIndex=44, charPositionInLine=8
type=INTLITERAL, text='42', line=5, startIndex=46, charPositionInLine=10
type=SEMI, text=';', line=5, startIndex=48, charPositionInLine=12
type=RBRACE, text='}', line=6, startIndex=50, charPositionInLine=0

And if you're looking for a way to get tokens from parser rules, every parser rule has a start and stop member in its ParserRuleReturnScope that can be cast to a CommonToken.

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The Token object contains line number, so getting a list of Token solves the issue. The trick is that without the do {} while loop, the tokens.getTokens() returns [] as is explained in this site.

    do
    {
        tokens.consume();
    } while (tokens.LA(1) != -1);

    List<Token> tokenList = tokens.getTokens();
    for (Token token : tokenList)
    {   
        int type = token.getType();
        bigList.add(type);
        int line = token.getLine();
        System.out.printf("LINE %d - TOKEN %d\n", line, type);
    }

When line 36 has this code "System.out.println(z);", the result is as follows:

LINE 36 - TOKEN 54 - IDENTIFIER
LINE 36 - TOKEN 31 - DOT
LINE 36 - TOKEN 54 - IDENTIFIER
LINE 36 - TOKEN 31 - DOT
LINE 36 - TOKEN 54 - IDENTIFIER
LINE 36 - TOKEN 70 - LPAREN
LINE 36 - TOKEN 54 - IDENTIFIER
LINE 36 - TOKEN 91 - RPAREN
LINE 36 - TOKEN 92 - SEMI

ADDED

For getting the column position, one can use "token. getCharPositionInLine()".

share|improve this answer
    
The line number is somewhat helpful, but in general you also want the beginning and ending columns. –  Ira Baxter Jan 18 '13 at 4:16
    
I guess getText() can be used to calculate the column position. I updated my answer. –  prosseek Jan 18 '13 at 4:34
    
And if there are two identifiers with the same name in the line? –  Ira Baxter Jan 18 '13 at 5:18
    
Bart Kiers gave me an answer, I can use token.getCharPositionInLine(). –  prosseek Jan 18 '13 at 19:30

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