Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A standard vector can be expanded to hold one more member by doing either:

std::vector<int> v;
v.push_back(1);

or

int os = v.size();
v.resize(os+1);
v[os] = 1;

Apart from the terseness of the code using push_back(), are there any other differences? For example, is one more efficient than the other, or is the extra memory assigned differently in each case?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by meagar, K-ballo, billz, sashoalm, Graviton Jan 22 '13 at 3:31

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
They're different functions designed for different purposes. Comparing them for "speed" isn't useful. –  meagar Jan 18 '13 at 3:57
    
push_back isn't terse; resize is verbose! –  Pubby Jan 18 '13 at 3:59
    
@meagar - but do they expand memory in the same way? –  Andrew S. Jan 18 '13 at 4:01
    
This thread may be useful to answer your question <stackoverflow.com/questions/1902832/…; –  taocp Jan 18 '13 at 4:04
2  
If your screw is appending, push_back is a screwdriver, and resize(size()+1) + assignment is a hammer. You might get the screw in, but it is clearly now what the tool was designed for. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 18 '13 at 4:57
show 1 more comment

5 Answers

push_back will construct in-place, meaning it calls the copy constructor.

resize will call the default constructor, and then v[os] will call the assignment operator.

Use push_back.


As Lightness says, the allocations in either case are equivalent. See his answer for more details.

Here's an example: http://stacked-crooked.com/view?id=43766666e5c72d282bd94c05e43e8897

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 if you include the fact that the memory allocations in either case should be completely equivalent. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 4:03
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit is that a requirement of the standard? I thought push_back tends to reserve more than it needs. –  Pubby Jan 18 '13 at 4:04
    
Thanks - that was the distinction I was looking for –  Andrew S. Jan 18 '13 at 4:04
    
I thought push_back only allocated the memory when growing, but resize allocated memory and then default initialized it. –  Marlon Jan 18 '13 at 4:05
    
@Pubby: No more or less so than resize –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 4:07
show 3 more comments

Memory expansion

but do they expand memory in the same way?

It is not specified explicitly in C++11 (I checked), but yes.

resize in this case is defined to "append to the container", the only logical interpretation of which makes it equivalent to insert and push_back in terms of allocation.

The back-end of the container implementation usually allocates "more than it needs" in all cases when its memory block is expanded — this is done by the standard not prohibiting it rather than the standard mandating it, and there is no wording to suggest that this is not the case for resize also.

Ultimately, then, it's completely up to the implementation, but I'd be surprised to see a difference in memory allocation rules between the two approaches on any mainstream compiler.

This testcase shows one simple example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::vector<int> a, b;

    for(int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
      a.push_back(0);
    for(int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
      b.resize(i+1);

    std::cout << a.capacity() << " , " << b.capacity() << std::endl;
}

// Output from my GCC 4.7.2:
//  128 , 128

Note that this one is subtly different:

int main() {
    std::vector<int> a, b;

    for(int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
      a.push_back(0);
    b.resize(100);

    std::cout << a.capacity() << " , " << b.capacity() << std::endl;
}

// Output from my GCC 4.7.2:
//  128 , 100

This is not a fair test between the two approaches, because in the latter example we're expanding memory in different increments, and the memory backing sequence containers tends to be expanded in multiples.


Performance concerns

Anyway, as @Pubby identifies, in the resize case you'll do the implicit construction followed by the explicit assignment, which is non-optimal if you're prematurely optimising.

In the real world, the real issue here is using the wrong function for the job and writing silly code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

They are not comparable, and you should not base the decision on performance, but that being said the performance might differ quite a lot depending on the implementation.

The standard requires push_back() to have amortized constant time, which basically means that the implementation must grow the buffer for the objects following a geometric series (i.e. when growing, the new size must be proportional to the previous size by a factor F > 1).

There is no such requirement for resize(). As a matter of fact some implementations assume that if you are calling resize() it is because you have better knowledge of what the final size of the vector will be. With that in mind, those implementations will grow the buffer (if needed) to exactly the size that you are requesting, not following a geometric progression. That means that the cost of appending following this mechanism can be O(N^2), instead of O(N) for the push_back case.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yeah, there can be a significant difference, particularly when using custom data types. Observe:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct S
{
    S()
    {
        std::cout << "S()\n";
    }

    S(const S&)
    {
        std::cout << "S(const S&)\n";
    }

    S& operator = (const S&)
    {
        std::cout << "operator =\n";
        return *this;
    }

    ~S()
    {
        std::cout << "~S()\n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<S> v1;

    std::cout << "push_back:\n";
    v1.push_back(S());

    std::vector<S> v2;

    std::cout << '\n' << "resize:\n";
    v2.resize(1);
    v2[0] = S();

    std::cout << "\nend\n"; // Ignore destructors after "end" (they're not pertinent to the comparison)
}

Output:

push_back:
S()
S(const S&)
~S()

resize:
S()
S(const S&)
~S()
S()
operator =
~S()

end
~S()
~S()

push_back FTW.

Edit: In response to @Lightness Races in Orbit's comment, this is, of course, just a silly example. S obviously isn't a really "useful" struct, and if you remove all the printing statements, or simply define S as struct S {};, then of course the compiler can optimize a lot of it away.

But since when do you only use incredibly trivial data types in a program? You'll use some trivial data types, but you'll also likely use some non-trivial data types someday too. These non-trivial data types may have expensive constructors, destructors, or assignment operators (or they may not be super expensive, but they may add up if you repeatedly use resize instead of push_back), and push_back would certainly be the right choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this really significant? Those calls are going to be optimised out when you remove the std::cout lines. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 4:09
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: The point is, though, that if you have some data type with non-trivial constructors, assignment operators, or destructors that you will have to pay for that. Of course trivial things don't matter that much (like the int example in the question); for non-trivial data types, however, it can add up. –  Cornstalks Jan 18 '13 at 4:11
    
I'm not going to suggest that anyone use resize+assignment over push_back, of course; I'm just not going to accept that it's going to be anywhere near the bottleneck in any more than 1% of cases :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 4:27
add comment

resize() may allocate memory better when you need to add add few elements.

i.e

std::vector<int> v;
for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    v.push_back(1);
or

int os = v.size();
v.resize(os.size() + n);
for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    v[os + i] = 1;

But in this case it's better to use

v.reserve(os.size() + n);

and then push_back's, it'll avoid construction + assignment too, as in your case

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.