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I have this strange hobby of porting things to OpenBSD. I know it has pthreads issues, but I won't be upgrading until the version coming out in May 2013. I'm using 5.0 and I'm fairly new to pthreads. I've gone through 1 tutorial, added them to a program of mine that needed them, it works.

Project du jour is rtl_fm.c from the rtl-sdr suite. Take a $20 dongle, plug it into a USB port, tune 24 - 1700 MHz with a software defined radio. I boot the same computer into OpenBSD, an old Debian Linux, and Windows XP so I can compare. It works almost under OpenBSD and works under Linux. I can copy the same code from one partition to another and reboot into the other OS. The version I'm working on I've added extra printfs to so I can see what's going on at least a little. OpenBSD seems to need more priority in the demodulation thread.

With my printfs added, under Linux I see

demod_thread_fn: doing sem_wait(&data_ready)
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data_ready was off, posting on
demod_thread_fn: past sem_wait
demod_thread_fn: calling full_demod
full_demod: about to rotate_90
full_demod: after rotate_90
full_demod wrote 384 bytes

To explain: demod_thread_fn is the main function assigned to the demod thread, it starts by doing a sem_wait on a semaphore called data_ready. rtlsdr_callback is called by the low level device driver when it has data to demodulate. Here it does sem_post on the data_ready semaphore. demod_thread_fn sees the change, calls full_demod, and the rest is normal, ending with writing out data to a file.

Under OpenBSD I see this:

demod_thread_fn: doing sem_wait(&data_ready)
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data_ready was off, posting on
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
rtlsdr_callback: data in buffer is 16384 bytes
demod_thread_fn: past sem_wait
demod_thread_fn: calling full_demod
full_demod: about to rotate_90
full_demod: after rotate_90
full_demod wrote 386 bytes
The sem_post on data_ready isn't noticed until about 6 more batches of data have come in (which are all lost) then finally one gets demodulated. The result is not intelligible. My modified code with the printfs added is here.

My question is how and/or if I can bump up the priority on the demod thread under OpenBSD. Is this one of the flaws in OpenBSD's pthreads implementation? I'm just starting to mess around with pthread_attr_setschedpolicy() but at the end of the man page for sched_get_priority_max() it says "This implementation does not support process scheduling.". Does that mean I'm out of luck? I'm not trying to change the whole process, just one thread.

Alan

I'm not sure how you're supposed to answer here, I ran into a character limit.

I tend to agree, or at least the buffer shouldn't be a fixed size so that it got added to until it got processed. It works fine under Linux though for some reason. This thing does up to 2 megasamples per second, each bufferful is about 16k, which becomes about 400 bytes of audio once it's processed. I don't fully understand it, but it's possible to record and capture every conversation in that 2 MHz of spectrum then demodulate what you want later. But in Linux I can get real-time audio from an FM broadcast station. I'll sign up to misc@openbsd.org again and ask there.

I did experiment a little with changing the priority but even as root I can only raise the priority number, not lower it. Supposedly it also compiles and runs under Windows. If I could figure out why it doesn't work under OpenBSD I might be able to get a few ifdefs into the mainstream code but I don't think the authors are going to bend over backwards to accommodate OpenBSD. It's all very new and moving very fast.

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Looks/sounds mor like a poor driver interface than a problem to be dealt with by priority-twiddling. If a driver is going to fill a buffer and signal a semaphore to make a buffer-processing thread ready, it should be loading into a separate buffer instance every time it runs, else it's highly likely that data wil be overwritten. Needs design fix, not priority bodges. –  Martin James Jan 19 '13 at 13:28
    
I tend to agree, or at least the buffer shouldn't be a fixed size so that it got added to until it got processed. It works fine under Linux though for some reason. This thing does up to 2 megasamples per second, each bufferful is about 16k, which becomes about 400 bytes of audio once it's processed. I don't fully understand it, but it's possible to record and capture every conversation in that 2 MHz of spectrum then demodulate what you want later. But in Linux I can get real-time audio from an FM broadcast station. I'll sign up to misc@openbsd.org again and ask there. –  ab1jx Jan 20 '13 at 3:27
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1 Answer

The version of OpenBSD being used there has a userland thread library which has various compromises including some unexpected behaviour with blocking file descriptors. Try again under 5.1 or newer which has kernel-backed threads and is far more likely to work.

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Thanks, I'm trying on another machine under 5.2 and still having problems, but slightly different. Any of the Osmocom suite of programs that use threads at best don't work, at worst dump core. It makes me wonder about the new thread library and how well tested it is. –  ab1jx Apr 18 '13 at 2:40
    
It works fairly well actually. It is intentionally strict about some things though. –  sthen Apr 20 '13 at 10:32
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