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I need to have the ability for the user to click a '+' which adds a new drop-down to an infinitely expanding collection of drop-downs. If I give them all the same id, will the jQuery change event know which one called the change event based on $(this) or do I need to have a new id for each new drop-down that is created during the page lifetime?

...if there is another control that must change in relation to which drop-down was changed, will there be a way to know which one relates to it if they all have the same id? (picture two drop-downs side by side where changing the first one changes the options on the second one, so it's like an infinitely expanding collection of PAIRS of drop-downs that relate to each other)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Don't give them the same ID as that is not valid and will not work. Give them the same class.

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will jQuery be able to tell which one called the change event? –  ioSamurai Sep 17 '09 at 14:35
    
how to I make infinite new IDs, [id]+[incrementing variable]? –  ioSamurai Sep 17 '09 at 14:36
    
You don't want IDs, like I said. You wan't all elements to have the same class name. This way you select them all with one simple selector. And yes, jQuery will know which element fired the event via this –  Josh Stodola Sep 17 '09 at 14:41

"The global structure of an HTML document" (HTML 4.01 Specification) on the id attribute:

This attribute assigns a name to an element. This name must be unique in a document.

So: in order to avoid unexpected behaviour, better keep your ids unique.

If you use JQuery's $(this) inside the change event, JQuery "will know" which one called it:

$('#id').change(function(){
  $(this).doWhatYouWantCauseAPirateIsFree();
});
// or
$('.class').change(function(){
  $(this).doWhatYouWantCauseAPirateIsFree();
});

The docs on Traversing help you finding the right function to use to find the elements you want to change.

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ok got it... so then, how do I accomplish the described functionality? how will jquery know which element called the change function so that I can in turn change the element or related element with ajax? –  ioSamurai Sep 17 '09 at 14:37
    
You can use JQuery's $(this) inside the function. It will reference the proper element. –  middus Sep 17 '09 at 14:39
    
is there a way I could harness $(this) to reference a nearby control? like $(this) will let me know which element called it, but what if I want to change another element based on the change to the first element, such as changing a drop-down changes a link right next to it, is there a handy way to relate the element that called the event to another element? –  ioSamurai Sep 17 '09 at 14:50
    
you could, e.g., use siblings(). The best place to find more on this is: docs.jquery.com/Traversing –  middus Sep 17 '09 at 14:51

Rather than an id, use a class attribute. If you define a function for each item with a particular class, the function can access $(this) to determine what to do.

$(".my-class").each(function(){
    var current_plus = $(this);
    //now do something with the variable
});
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