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Why did java have the reputation of being slow?

I have implemented the same algorithm with both java and c++. Could anyone explain why the java version is much slower than the c++ version (500us vs 20us)?

You can run the code at http://leetcode.com/onlinejudge, under the question Pascal's Triangle.

public class Solution {
    public ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> generate(int numRows) {
        ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> aal = new ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>>();
        if(numRows == 0)
            return aal;

        ArrayList<Integer> al = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        al.add(1);
        aal.add(al);

        ArrayList<Integer> temp = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        temp.add(0);
        temp.add(1);
        temp.add(0);

        for(int i = 1; i < numRows; ++i) {
            ArrayList<Integer> ali = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            for(int j = 1; j < temp.size(); ++j) {
                ali.add(temp.get(j-1) + temp.get(j));
            }
            temp.clear();
            temp.add(0);
            temp.addAll(ali);
            temp.add(0);
            aal.add(ali);
        }
        return aal;
    }

}


class Solution {
public:
    vector<vector<int> > generate(int numRows) {
        // Start typing your C/C++ solution below
        // DO NOT write int main() function
        vector<vector<int> > vvi;
        if(numRows == 0)
            return vvi;

        vector<int> temp(1,0);
        temp.push_back(1);
        temp.push_back(0);

        vvi.push_back(vector<int>(1,1));

        for(int i = 1; i < numRows; ++i) {
            vector<int> vi;
            for(int j = 1; j < temp.size(); ++j) {
                vi.push_back(temp[j-1] + temp[j]);
            }
            vvi.push_back(vi);
            temp.clear();
            temp.push_back(0);
            copy(vi.begin(), vi.end(), inserter(temp, temp.end()));
            temp.push_back(0); 
        }
    }
};
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marked as duplicate by WhozCraig, K-ballo, Yehuda Katz, BЈовић, home Jan 18 '13 at 8:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
see this thread? stackoverflow.com/questions/2163411/… –  taocp Jan 18 '13 at 5:25
    
Why are you using Integer in Java? Shouldn't that be int? –  Pubby Jan 18 '13 at 5:27
2  
@Pubby Generics only work for objects –  Seth Carnegie Jan 18 '13 at 5:29
1  
One of possible reasons Java code is slower is Autoboxing. Here you have few questions about it: question1, question2. –  Pshemo Jan 18 '13 at 5:44
1  
Why is this a duplicate? The question is about a concrete algorithm that uses massive autoboxing and therefore slow. I think that replacing ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> with ArrayList<int[]> would eliminate most of the performance problem. –  Csq Jan 19 '13 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Who says it's slower?

For the java program, try:

public static void main(String args[]) {
Date start = new Date();
for (int i = 0; i < 10000 ; i++) {
  new Solution().generate(20);
}
System.out.println(new Date().getTime() - start.getTime());

and compare with this for the C++ program:

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  clock_t start = clock() / (CLOCKS_PER_SEC / 1000);
  Solution *sol = new Solution;
  for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    sol->generate(20);

  printf("%lu\n",  clock() / (CLOCKS_PER_SEC / 1000) - start);
  delete sol;
}

On my Mac, running the java program with java 7 is twice as fast as the c++ binary compiled with g++ -O2. Try changing the numbers (e.g. 30000 loops for 30).

Bottom line: the numbers you get from the website are bunk. You have no idea how they measure them, or how they are compiling / executing the programs.

share|improve this answer
    
Not for me, on my system (linux, java 1.7) the C++ solution is slightly faster (around 10-15%). jvm startup adds another 40% to the runtime of the java program, depending on use case that should be considered. Also, neither solution is very optimized. The c++ code spends approx. 75% allocating memory, that's no way to benchmark an algorithm. With slight optimization of the c++ code it runs 4 times faster than the java code, but I'm fairly certain optimizing the java code would balance that. –  Tannin Jan 18 '13 at 8:20

The Algorithm does not slow down. It's the language that makes an impact on the execution. As we are all aware, Java does not convert your code directly into object code. It first gets compiled and then there is an extra phase of interpreting it by the JVM. This is indeed slower when compared to C or C++ which does not have the extra phase.

Well, everything comes with a cost. Here, the cost is code portability Vs Speed.

share|improve this answer
    
language has nothing to do with it; it's the runtime. interpreted C++ would be much slower than Java. and JIT JVMs will certainly generate object code –  Eevee Jan 18 '13 at 5:42
    
Agreed! Depending on the requirement, if different flavours of JVMs are used, it would optimize. However, if you stick to the standard JVM, you might see the hick! Well, yes - JIT and other hot-spots machines do generate object code and some ON THE FLY! –  mreaper Feb 9 '13 at 16:14

Use JVM in server mode. You will see big change in execution time. see this http://javapapers.com/index.php?s=server+mode

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My guess is that your algorithm get's compiled to different assembly by your C++ compiler and your java compiler. Check both compilers for optimization flags.

share|improve this answer
    
Java Doesn't compile to assembly, genius. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 18 '13 at 6:05
    
@RichardJ.RossIII: At least in most implementations it takes a detour through Java byte codes first, but the basic point of the JIT compiler is to produce assembly (or equivalently, machine code). It's been a long time since the JVM normally interpreted byte code at run time, at least for tight loops. At the same time, it seems pretty obvious that if the speed is substantially different, the machine code being executed must be different as well. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 18 '13 at 6:50

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