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What is the most efficient way to create a column of vectors in a data.table where we need to match elements from a second data.table.

For example, given the two data.tables below

   > A_ids.DT        > rec_data_table
      name id           bid counts names_list
   1:    A  1        1: 301     21        C,E
   2:    B  2        2: 302     21          E
   3:    C  3        3: 303      5      H,E,G
   4:    D  4        4: 304     10        H,D
   5:    F  6        5: 305      3          E
   6:    G  7        6: 306      5          G
   7:    H  8        7: 307      6        B,C
   8:    J 10        
   9:    K 11        

I would like to create a new column in rec_data_table where each element is a list of the id's from A_ids.DT as referenced in rec_data_table[,names_list]

IMPORTANT: The order represented in each entry of names_list must be reflected in the new column. ie: for row 3: (H, E, G) we should get c(8, NA, 7)

The following line, which uses sapply works, but I question its efficiency.
Are there better (ie quicker, more elegant) alternatives? (Note that the actual data is several 100K of rows)

rec_data_table[, A_IDs.list := sapply(names_list, function(n) c(A_ids.DT[n, id]$id))]

   bid counts names_list A_IDs.list
1: 301     21        C,E       3,NA
2: 302     21          E         NA
3: 303      5      H,E,G     8,NA,7
4: 304     10        H,D        8,4
5: 305      3          E         NA
6: 306      5          G          7
7: 307      6        B,C        2,3


#--------------------------------------------------#
#           SAMPLE DATA                            #

library(data.table)
set.seed(101)

  rows <- size <- 7
  varyingLengths <- c(sample(1:3, rows, TRUE))
  A <-  lapply(varyingLengths, function(n) sample(LETTERS[1:8], n))
  counts <- round(abs(rnorm(size)*12))   
rec_data_table <- data.table(bid=300+(1:size), counts=counts, names_list=A, key="bid")

A_ids.DT <- data.table(name=LETTERS[c(1:4,6:8,10:11)], id=c(1:4,6:8,10:11), key="name")
share|improve this question
1  
+1 What a great question! Example small tables side by side - nice. –  Matt Dowle Jan 18 '13 at 11:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps unpack the lists, then join the whole table, then repack?

tmp <- setkey(rec_data_table[, list(names = names_list[[1]],
                                    orig.order = seq_along(names_list[[1]])),
                             by = list(bid, counts)], names)
tmp <- A_ids.DT[tmp]
setkey(tmp, orig.order)
tmp <- tmp[, list(names_list = list(name), A_IDs.list = list(id)),
           by = list(bid, counts)]

# Rearrange to sample output order
setkey(tmp, bid)
setcolorder(tmp, c("bid", "counts", "names_list", "A_IDs.list"))


### Output###
> tmp
#   bid counts names_list A_IDs.list
# 1: 301     21        C,E       3,NA
# 2: 302     21          E         NA
# 3: 303      5      H,E,G     8,NA,7
# 4: 304     10        H,D        8,4
# 5: 305      3          E         NA
# 6: 306      5          G          7
# 7: 307      6        B,C        2,3

> identical(tmp, rec_data_table[, A_IDs.list := sapply(names_list, function(n) c(A_ids.DT[n, id]$id))])
# [1] TRUE

Timings

I increased the number of rows in rec_data_table to 1e5 and got the following timings.

Method presented in question:

> system.time(rec_data_table[, A_IDs.list := sapply(names_list, function(n) c(A_ids.DT[n, id]$id))])
   user  system elapsed 
 196.89    0.04  197.81 

Method presented here:

> system.time( {
+ tmp <- setkey(rec_data_ta .... [TRUNCATED] 
   user  system elapsed 
   0.95    0.00    0.95 
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting answer, and thank you. I should have clarified in my question that the order of 'names_list' must be preserved. I will update my question –  Ricardo Saporta Jan 18 '13 at 6:39
1  
@RicardoSaporta Okay, I kept the original order of names_list via the additions of line 2 and 5. It slowed down slightly but now reports an identical answer to the method presented in the question. –  user1935457 Jan 18 '13 at 6:53
2  
+1 Great answer. I doubt I can improve on that. The tmp in A_ids.DT[tmp] doesn't have to be keyed; that would then retain the order. If i isn't keyed, that join will be slower though. But then you'd get a saving by not needing to explicitly deal with the change in order. IIUC, that balance depends on the sizes, uniqueness, etc of the data. –  Matt Dowle Jan 18 '13 at 11:52
    
+1 for the x200 gain, nice ! –  statquant Jan 18 '13 at 15:43
    
Thanks a lot for the help on this and the other question! –  Ricardo Saporta Jan 19 '13 at 15:54

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