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I have a list. Let's say it's 10 items long. They are all string type list items. I'm trying to find a short way to change the 3rd through 10th item into an integer type object while leaving the first 2 as strings. Python 3.3

yeah it wasn't quite working so i tried splitting it into a list of its own and this happened.

Traceback (most recent call last):

  File "project1.py", line 10, in <module>

    hList=list(map(int,row[2:]))                       #row is the name of my string list

ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '6.67'

I tried printing hList and it displayed the first 4 of the 24 in my loop

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It looks like you are actually dealing with float rather than int. Change the call to list(map(float,row[2:])) –  Abhijit Jan 18 '13 at 10:27
    
yup that's what it was –  Alex Mollberg Jan 18 '13 at 12:12
    
If any of the answers helped, please don;t forget to accept it –  Abhijit Jan 18 '13 at 16:38

4 Answers 4

This is a rare case when I'd use the index in a loop:

In [1]: l = list(map(str, range(10)))

In [2]: l
Out[2]: ['0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9']

In [3]: for i in range(2, 10):
   ...:     l[i] = int(l[i])
   ...:     

In [4]: l
Out[4]: ['0', '1', 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

or use a slice assignment as Abhijit shows.

Note that if you use a list and ...

  1. It's not homogeneous (some items are integers, some are not),
  2. Its length is fixed (you know in advance it's 10),

then maybe list isn't the best choice of data structure. Consider using a tuple or a dict instead. There are some nice extensions of these in the collections module, too.

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wow awesome! i have been trying to figure this out for hours. thanks! i would upvote if it let me –  Alex Mollberg Jan 18 '13 at 8:23
    
uh oh. it's not working. i used len(list) for the second part of my range. hmmm. edit:I lied i had 2 lists mixed up. –  Alex Mollberg Jan 18 '13 at 8:40

This can be easily done with slice assignment

>>> l = list(map(str, range(10)))
>>> l[2:] = map(int, l[2:])
>>> l
['0', '1', 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Another way of approaching this problem is to split it as two list, and converting one of them to an integer list.

>>> l = list(map(str, range(10)))
>>> l = l[:2] + map(int, l[2:])
>>> l
['0', '1', 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The difference is, in the later case, you create a new list where as in the former in updates the list in place

@Ashwini mentioned, Python 3, map returns a map object rather than a list, so you may want to pass it through a list call or better make it a list comprehension

l[2:] = [int(e) for e in  l[2:]]

or

l[2:] = list(map(int, l[2:]))
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In py3x map() returns a map object. so, l = l[:2] + map(int, l[2:]) will fail. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 18 '13 at 8:27
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: I am still stuck with Py2X :-) anyway, I agree its worth mentioning –  Abhijit Jan 18 '13 at 8:31
    
thanks i'll give it a try. –  Alex Mollberg Jan 18 '13 at 8:42
    
Same here, even I hardly ever use 3x. But as the question was tagged with 3x, so, I thought it's worth pointing out. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 18 '13 at 8:56
    
The slice assignment works fine in Python3, what should be fixed is the code where you try to add a slice and a map object. –  Lev Levitsky Jan 18 '13 at 11:46

You could use list comprehension:

>>> mylist[2:] = [int(l) for l in mylist[2:]]

>>> mylist
['0', '1', 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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A simple for loop can do that:

my_list = ['1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10']
new_list = []
for index in range(2, 10): # start at 2 because indexing starts at 0
    my_num = float(my_list[index]) # if the number was not an integer, but a float, it is better to use float(),
    new_list.append(my_num)        # which can handle both floats and integers
print new_list # so you can see the result

Output:

[3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0]
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