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Do I need to add an index anoatation for the primary key of a hibernate table for decent performance, I assumed that marking a field with @id would mean an index was created

@Id
private String guid;

but I didnt notice anything being created in the ddl that was generated

But if I added an @index annotation

@Id
@org.hibernate.annotations.Index(name = "IDX_GUID")
private String guid;

then I do notice an index being created in the DDL.

So I'm thinking I need to do this for every table, but part of me is thinking is this really neccessary as surely hibernate would want indexes created for the primary key as a starting point ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You do NOT have to create index explicitly. Instead of seeing DDL statements; I will recommend you to check the final schema created by hibernate. The index is created as part of create table statement.

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Thankyou, thats make sense. –  Paul Taylor Jan 18 '13 at 8:45
    
@Deepak, just to confirm my understanding, are you saying that Index creation is not handled as part of the DDL (hbm2ddl) export process? If so, that would make the DDL largely useless, or am I missing something here? Thanks –  paulkmoore Jan 9 at 17:21
    
@paulkmoore We can create index in two ways; viz. "Create index ..." or while creating the table we can specify .. All I am saying is that in this case index on primary key is created while creating table. –  Deepak Jan 10 at 5:28
    
@Deepak, Ok thanks, I was missing the distinction between the primary key indexes and other (general) indexes. Thanks for the help. –  paulkmoore Jan 10 at 12:38
    
See also - Table - indexes –  paulkmoore Jan 10 at 13:21

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