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Let me start by telling that I know the contents of MSDN on boxing and unboxing and seen the post on SO on boxing and unboxing. I also understand why boxing is useful, what it does on a high level and have worked with IL on many occasions... so please don't hold back.

What I would like to know is how boxing and unboxing works exactly, preferably with proof. What I mean with that is:

  • Does the runtime really copy the data on the heap for every boxing/unboxing operation or does it use tricks like reference counting?
  • Is the boxed value on the heap garbage collected with the std. garbage collector or is it in a special piece of memory?
  • Or more general: Do different rules apply to boxed values on the heap? (because I can understand why that might be the case)
  • Does the runtime IL optimize boxing/unboxing operations when inlining code or is that not possible? If possible, can you 'help' the JIT compilation a bit?
  • It seems boxed values includes a type; what/how much is the data structure (or: overhead) of a boxed value? What does it look like 'internally'?
  • Since both value types and class types derive from object, and since a boxed value is supposed to be a class type, I wondered if the vtable lookup for a boxed value type is different than a vtable lookup for a value type?
  • Why is 'int?' implemented as value-type rather than a box?

In other words, where the posts I've read talk about "runtime implementation details", that's exactly what I want to know :-)

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codeproject.com/Articles/76153/… –  MMK Jan 18 '13 at 8:43
    
"runtime implementation details", that's exactly what I want to know - then specify which runtime. –  Henk Holterman Jan 18 '13 at 8:43
    
    
@HenkHolterman well, if there are differences I'd like to know them :-) But primarily the Microsoft .NET runtime, I'm less interested in Mono. (4.0 x64 is what I primarily work with mostly). –  atlaste Jan 18 '13 at 9:01
    
@MMK that information is more or less what I posted myself and is perfectly described on hundreds of places... I'm well aware of how IL works and what the concept of boxing is; I'm interested in the nitty gritty low-level details. So if you like, on the 'intel' level, not on the IL level. –  atlaste Jan 18 '13 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

At last I think I figured it out... Here are the answers that I found. If I made errors, please let me know.

  • Does the runtime really copy the data on the heap for every boxing/unboxing operation or does it use tricks like reference counting?

    public void Test6()
    {
        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
        GC.WaitForFullGCComplete();
    
        object[] myarr = new object[1024 * 1024];
    
        long mem1 = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
    
        int a = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < myarr.Length; ++i)
        {
            myarr[i] = a;
        }
    
        long mem2 = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
    
        Console.WriteLine("Total memory usage is {0} bytes", mem2 - mem1);
    
        // Make sure we use it so that the JIT doesn't optimize our code
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < myarr.Length; ++i)
        {
            sum += (int)myarr[i];
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Sum = {0}", sum);
    }
    

The result of this is 12582912 for x86 - which is the behaviour of full-blown objects: 4x1M int's, 4x1M type references and 4x1M pointers stored in the array. Answer: it just copies to the heap.

That makes it very unlikely that the runtime uses different rules IMO.

  • Does the runtime IL optimize boxing/unboxing operations when inlining code or is that not possible? If possible, can you 'help' the JIT compilation a bit?

It appears not. Try:

    private object IntBox1()
    {
        return 1;
    }

    private int IntNotBox1()
    {
        return 1;
    }

    public int Total1()
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        {
            sum += (int)IntBox1();
        }
        return sum;
    }
    public int Total2()
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        {
            sum += IntNotBox1();
        }
        return sum;
    }

There's a notable difference in time, so it doesn't. I haven't found a way to help the runtime optimizing the boxing/unboxing. If anyone has found any way to make the runtime optimize the box/unbox operation away, please share it.

  • Since both value types and class types derive from object, and since a boxed value is supposed to be a class type, I wondered if the vtable lookup for a boxed value type is different than a vtable lookup for a value type?

This appears to be the case: vtable lookups on a value type are much faster.

    public void Test4()
    {
        int a = 1;
        object oa = a;

        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        {
            sum += a.GetHashCode();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Calc {0} took {1:0.000}s", sum, new TimeSpan(sw.ElapsedTicks).TotalSeconds);

        sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        {
            sum += oa.GetHashCode();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Calc {0} took {1:0.000}s", sum, new TimeSpan(sw.ElapsedTicks).TotalSeconds);
    }
  • Why is 'int?' implemented as value-type rather than a box?

I now think this has to do with 2 reasons.

  1. performance and memory size. The overhead of int? is 4 bytes, while the overhead of a boxed value is 4 bytes on x86 and 8 bytes on x64. That means int? is faster or equally fast to copy as an object. Overhead when copying through methods is the same. Also using value-type vtable lookups is much faster.
  2. compatibility. The type of a boxed object = the type of an unboxed object. For int? you want a different type without breaking compatibility with older versions of code. Changing int? to object requires language support AND breaks older versions that rely on these types to be the same.

Concluding: boxing really always copies the value type to the heap and it's just a normal object. The only strange thing you might notice is that the type reference in the object is a type reference to the original (value) type of the unboxed value. I cannot find any evidence suggesting a boxed value is not a "normal class-type" object that lives on the heap.

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1  
There are no vtable lookups on value types. The JITter has to know the near-exact type of every value-type storage location when it's allocating space for it, except that generic type parameters that are reference types may sometimes be considered equivalent to Object. Consequently, the Jitter knows before trying to call a.GetHashCode() that it's going to call int.GetHashCode(). –  supercat Feb 6 '13 at 21:42
    
Thanks for that addition, that makes a lot of sense and reflects my tests. –  atlaste Feb 6 '13 at 21:50

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