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I don't know why the output is different when commenting out the seventh line. The code is as follows:

#!/usr/bin/python
import threading
import time    
def loop(thread_name):      
    if False:
        print "1111"   #The print is only used to prove this code block indeed not excute 
        global dict_test   # The output will be different when commenting this line code
    else:
        dict_test = {}
    i = 0
    while i < 10:
        i+=1
        print  "thread %s %s" % (thread_name,id(dict_test))
        time.sleep(1)

t1=threading.Thread(target=loop,args=('1'))
t2=threading.Thread(target=loop,args=('2'))
t1.start()
t2.start()
t1.join()
t2.join()

If the explanation is that the global variable is precompiled no matter which condition is matched, why will the following code report an error ?

#!/usr/bin/python
import threading
import time    
def loop(thread_name):        
    if False:
        print "1111"   #The print is only used to prove this code block indeed not excute 
        global dict_test   # The output will be different when commenting or uncommenting this line code 
    else:
#        dict_test = {}
        pass
    i = 0
    while i < 10:
        i+=1
        print  "thread %s %s" % (thread_name,id(dict_test))
        time.sleep(1)

t1=threading.Thread(target=loop,args=('1'))
t2=threading.Thread(target=loop,args=('2'))
t1.start()
t2.start()
t1.join()
t2.join()
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2  
Why the downvote? –  user176581 Jan 18 '13 at 9:07
    
Nice quirk; even I was a bit fooled by it. –  user176581 Jan 18 '13 at 9:08
1  
What's the error? –  Alex L Jan 18 '13 at 9:09
    
Hi Alex, my question is that I don't know why the output of my program is different when comment dict_test = {} or remvoe the comment. You could take a try on your PC first. –  user1675167 Jan 18 '13 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

To resolve the name of a variable Python searches:

  • the local scope

  • the scope of any enclosing functions

  • the global scope

  • the built-ins

(source)

if and other flow control structures are not mentioned here. Thus, the scope inside the if is the same as outside, thus an existing variable dict_test is made global, no matter if this block is being executed or not.

This might be surprising, but that's how it is defined.

The output for me is

thread 1 50663904
thread 2 50667360
thread 1 50667360
thread 2 50667360
thread 1 50667360
thread 2 50667360
...

So initially, when both Threads start off at the same time the two variables are independent. Starting with the second iteration, they both reference the same global variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Thorsten. Thanks for your responser, But I'm still a bit puzzled. If that is so, why my second program will report error (global name 'dict_test' is not defined)? –  user1675167 Jan 18 '13 at 9:34
    
I corrected my explanation, maybe this time I'm not missing the point. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 18 '13 at 9:39
    
I have a further understanding about global block. Thanks very much. But.... Is my second program normal on your pc ?... why I always get error?... –  user1675167 Jan 18 '13 at 9:56
    
The second program isn't running on my PC as well, as you never define dict_test. It has to be defined to be made global. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 18 '13 at 10:32

Irrespective of whether the if statement is executed, the global statement applies. So when commenting out the global statement, the assignment of dict_test applies to the local scope.

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