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I have an xml like this:

<xml>
    <node name="1">node1</node>
    <node name="2">node2</node>
    <node name="3">node3</node>
    <node>node4</node>
</xml>

How do I check that <node name="3">node3</node> is the last node with a @name attribute?

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whathaveyourtried.com –  Gung Foo Jan 18 '13 at 8:47
    
@GungFoo, Oh, come on. I tried position() = last() but this seems to check for the last node of the kind. Testing for test="./@name[position() = last()]" doesn't work as well. –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 8:52
    
you generally talk about XML and like leoPark asked in his answer... what are you even using to try and parse this XML? please read the FAQ on how to ask a question. :) –  Gung Foo Jan 18 '13 at 8:53
    
@GungFoo, Please, be more attentive. The tag states quite clear it's XSL. –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 8:54
    
The tags aren't just for getting your question answered but also so that people searching in the future have an easier time finding these questions. It's also the reason why a fully fledged question is preferred, with input, "whatyouhavetried.com" and what an acceptable correct answer would look like. You should work just as hard writing your question as someone would have to answer it. This helps the people willing to answer your question and people who come across it in the future. Then again, I shouldn't have to explain this. –  Horba Jan 18 '13 at 12:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could make use of the following-sibling operator here. Assuming you were positioned on a node elemenet, you just need to check the current node has an name attribute but no following-sibling does

<xsl:if test="@name and not(following-sibling::node[@name])">

This could also be done as part of a template match

<xsl:template match="node[@name][not(following-sibling::node[@name])]">

For example, try the following XSLT

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="node[@name][not(following-sibling::node[@name])]">
        <xsl:copy>
                <xsl:attribute name="last">1</xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied to your XML, the following is output

<xml>
   <node name="1">node1</node>
   <node name="2">node2</node>
   <node last="1" name="3">node3</node>
   <node>node4</node>
</xml>

EDIT: Actually, in a template match, you could make use of last here. The following template match should also work.

<xsl:template match="node[@name][last()]">
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Thank you, didn't know about the following-sibling function. –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 9:04
    
@svz following-sibling is an axis, not a function. It may sound like I'm being pedantic but you need to know the right terms to be able to make sense of the documentation in future... –  Ian Roberts Jan 18 '13 at 9:18
    
@IanRoberts, Thanks =) Actually, I'm not really familiar with XSL yet, so I find many things strange and confusing. –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 9:19
    
@svz indeed, xslt being a functional language requires quite a different mindset from more procedural or OO languages. It's worth persevering and getting comfortable with the template matching approach - avoid the temptation to slip back into xsl:for-each and xsl:choose if you can :-) –  Ian Roberts Jan 18 '13 at 9:23

What language you used? php or javascript ,C#,asp,asp.net

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If you checked the tag, you'd see it's XSL –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 8:53

You just used this code :

<xsl:template match="/node/[@name='3'][last()]"> 
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Ok, but what if the @name is not 3? =) –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 9:03
    
oXmlDocument.DocumentElement.LastChild.SelectSingleNode("name").Text –  leoPark Jan 18 '13 at 9:08
    
And once again, it's XSL =) –  svz Jan 18 '13 at 9:09

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