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Currently, I have code like this:

    static void Main()
    {
        int whichClass = 0;
        if (whichClass == 0)
        {
            //repeat code
            TestAbstract clTest = new ClassA();
            clTest.MainFunc();
        }
        else if (whichClass == 1)
        {
            //repeat code
            TestAbstract clTest = new ClassB();
            clTest.MainFunc();
        }
        else if (whichClass == 10)
        {
            //repeat code
            TestAbstract clTest = new ClassX();
            clTest.MainFunc();
        }
    }

As you see, I have to write code 3 times for initial and call function at 3 different classes.

What I want is we just call 1 time with dynamic class. How can it is possible?

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closed as off topic by rene, Goran Jovic, Linger, jv42, Beska Jan 18 '13 at 14:03

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4  
Belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com ? –  Soner Gönül Jan 18 '13 at 9:05
1  
Why the downvote? –  Default Jan 18 '13 at 9:06
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7 Answers

Well, you could have a Dictionary<int, Type>, or a Dictionary<int, Func<TestAbstract>:

var typeMapping = new Dictionary<int, Type>
{
    { 0, typeof(ClassA) },
    { 1, typeof(ClassB) },
    { 10, typeof(ClassX) }
};

...
Type type;
if (typeMapping.TryGetValue(whichClass, out type))
{
    TestAbstract test = (TestAbstract) Activator.CreateInstance(type);
    test.MainFunc();
}

Using a Func<TestAbstract> would give more flexibility for how you created the TestAbstract instances, and provide more compile-time type safety, but be more long-winded:

var factoryMapping = new Dictionary<int, Func<TestAbstract>>
{
    { 0, () => new ClassA() },
    { 1, () => new ClassB() },
    { 10, () => new ClassX() }
};

...
Func<TestAbstract> factory;
if (factoryMapping.TryGetValue(whichClass, out factory))
{
    TestAbstract test = factory();
    test.MainFunc();
}

It's not clear where the integer values are coming from, by the way - you might want an enum for that. Heck, the enum names could even be the names of the types:

TestClass whichClass = TestClass.ClassA;

...

Type type = Type.GetType("SomeNamespace." + whichClass);
TestAbstract test = (TestAbstract) Activator.CreateInstance(type);
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2  
Damn it, Skeet... you edited in the second half of the post just as I was writing out that version. +1 –  Adam Maras Jan 18 '13 at 9:08
    
yes. You definately help me a lot. Thank you. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:57
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You can create a Factory class, which would return the object according to the parameter passed.

public static TestAbstractFactory
{
  public static TestAbstract GetTestAbstract(int whichClass)
  { 
      switch(whichClass)
      {
      case 0:
        return new ClassA();
      case 1:
        return new ClassB();
      case 10:
        return new ClassX();
      default: 
        return null;
      }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@CodesInChaos, thanks :), thanks again :) –  Habib Jan 18 '13 at 9:07
    
yes. Thank you. I'll try to apply this. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:40
add comment
static void Main()
{
        int whichClass = 0;
        TestAbstract clTest = null;
        if (whichClass == 0)
            clTest = new ClassA();
        else if (whichClass == 1)
             clTest = new ClassB();
        else if (whichClass == 10)
             clTest = new ClassX();
        if(clTest != null)
             clTest.MainFunc();

}

share|improve this answer
    
yes. Thank you. I'll try to apply this. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:47
add comment

Assuming ClassA to C derives from TestAbstract and assuming MainFunc is a virtual method on TestAbstract, you can use the following code

static void Main()
{
    int whichClass = 0; // 0 to 2
    Type type = new[] { typeof(ClassA), typeof(ClassB), typeof(ClassC) } [ whichClass ];        
    TestAbstract clTest = (TestAbstract) Activator.CreateInstance(type);
    clTest.MainFunc();
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes. Thank you. I'll try to apply this. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:39
add comment

static void Main()

{
    int whichClass = 0;
    TestAbstract clTest;

    if (whichClass == 0)
    {
        //repeat code
         clTest = new ClassA();
    }
    else if (whichClass == 1)
    {
        //repeat code
        clTest = new ClassB();
    }
    else if (whichClass == 10)
    {
        //repeat code
        clTest = new ClassX();
    }
    if(clTest != null)
        clTest.MainFunc();
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes. Thanks, but I've already knew about this approach. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:29
add comment
static void Main()
{
  int whichClass = 0;
  TestAbstract clTest ;
  if (whichClass == 0)
  {
   //repeat code
   clTest = new ClassA();
  }
  else if (whichClass == 1)
  {
   //repeat code
   clTest = new ClassB();
  }
 else if (whichClass == 10)
 {
  //repeat code
   clTest = new ClassX();        
  }

  clTest.MainFunc();
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes. Thanks, but I've already knew about this approach. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:38
add comment

you can use reflection.

string whichClass = "className";
Type t = Type.GetType(whichClass);
TestAbstract o = (TestAbstract)Activator.CreateInstance(t);
o.MainFunc();
share|improve this answer
    
yes. Thank you. I'll try to apply this. –  Lang thang Jan 21 '13 at 3:39
add comment

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