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I would like to embed JSON in HTML. The most elegant solution I have found makes use of the script-tag and the mime media type application/json.

<script id="data" type="application/json">
    {
        "foo" : "bar"
    }
</script> 

Is this the standard way of embedding JSON? If not, are there any risks with the above solution?

Reasons for using inline JSON (instead of a JSON-P service):

  • Small amounts of JSON-data
  • Less HTTP-requests
  • Preference for inline-JSON to data in HTML-attributes

[UPDATE] Reason for embedding json.

I have a gallery widget for a website with very high traffic. The gallery can consist of a 100 images or more. I am only showing one image at a time and the rest of the images will be lazy loaded. However the information (image src) to all images will be rendered in the html on page load. There are various ways to render the image information in the html. Instead of using JSON I could also use html data attributes as shown below:

<li class="image" data-src="image-path.jpg">
    <!-- image tag will be created here using javascript -->
</li>

Will result in:

<li class="image image-loaded" data-src="image-path.jpg">
    <img src="image-path.jpg" />
</li>

The disadvantage with the above solution is the extra markup. I would rather use JSON and a Javascript-Templating engine such as doT.js.

share|improve this question
2  
What are you going to do with the json your are "embedding"? –  PeeHaa Jan 18 '13 at 9:21
2  
You're better off storing the json as an object in javascript. There is no reason to have embedded json, unless you're somehow going to avoid using javascript to access that json again. –  dead Jan 18 '13 at 9:24
3  
JSON is a method for transferring data. It's not something that should be used for its own sake. Especially when you're dealing with JavaScript, there's practically no reason to prefer JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) over actual JavaScript objects. –  Juhana Jan 18 '13 at 9:29
    
Is it static content you want to embed? Or would you serve the HTML files prepopulated with the embedded JSON? Otherwise I don't see any advantage to embed the JSON directly in HTML –  intuitivepixel Jan 18 '13 at 9:30
    
@PeeHaa: I have updated my question with a reason. –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 9:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Reasons for using inline JSON (instead of a JSON-P service)

You can inline JSON-P as well. OK, you just call that method "inline script", but it has the advantages of both :-)

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You're absolutely right, but I don't need JSON-P when using JSON inline. –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 10:47
1  
With JavaScript object literals, you a) don't need JSON.parse etc. b) can use Date objects and similar non-JSON things c) can directly append the gallery code (instead of separate <script> elements) d) don't need to wait for DOMready to extract the JSON –  Bergi Jan 18 '13 at 10:58
    
a) and b) make sense, although I'm just receiving plain text data, so b) doesn't worry me. Could you explain c) I'm not sure I understand correctly? d) is no issue, since Javascript execution begins only when the DOM is loaded. –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 11:03
    
I was sleeping when I added my first comment to your answer. Not having to use JSON.parse is a plus and I can do that if I assign the JSON to a global variable, similar to JSON-P. –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 14:50
    
And using JSON-P makes my main question almost irrelevant :-) –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 14:51

I am answering my own question since I have had to find a solution. My solution is based on what Bergi suggested using inline JSONP. It is a better solution than finding an answer to my actual question since no manual JSON-parsing is required.

The JSON-data (and HTML) is generated with Java Server Pages (JSP).

Step 1

A custom variable name is created using JSP. It will be used as the javascript global variable to which the json data will be assigned to. The name is randomly generated to prevent naming conflicts on the same page.

<c:set var="jsonpVarName">jsnpData<%= java.lang.Math.round(java.lang.Math.random() * 1000000) %></c:set>    

Step 2 The script tag has a cssClassname to identify it by and a data-var-attribute, so that the custom variable name can be determined. ${ctrl.json}is JSP and prints out JSON. Unlike JSONP which uses a callback-Function, a global variable is used. So far I have not experienced any drawbacks.

<script class="data" data-var="${jsonpVarName}" type="text/javascript">
    window.${jsonpVarName} = ${ctrl.json};
</script>

Step 3 Accessing the data (using jQuery) is as easy as:

var data = window[$('script.data').data('var')];

Example with context

HTML

<div class="myWidget">
    <button class="fetchData">Fetch Data</button>


    <c:set var="jsonpVarName">jsnpData<%= java.lang.Math.round(java.lang.Math.random() * 1000000) %></c:set>

    <script class="data" data-var="${jsonpVarName}" type="text/javascript">
        window.${jsonpVarName} = ${ctrl.json};
    </script>

</div> 

Javascript

$('button.fetchData', '.myWidget').click(function (e) {

    var data = window[$('script.data', '.myWidget').data('var')];    

});

I'm using inline JSONP to load JSON-data which is required on page load. It isn't a lot of data and it's one HTTP-Request less.

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What you suggest is absolutely correct. The type attributes of the script tag must be a valid MIME descriptor. According to the official JSON RFC section 6 "IANA Considerations":

The MIME media type for JSON text is application/json.
Type name: application
Subtype name: json

So your HTML is valid:

<script id="data" type="application/json">
    {
        "foo" : "bar"
    }
</script> 

And, no, there are no additional risks involved in doing this.

share|improve this answer
    
Please read benalpert.com/2012/08/03/preventing-xss-json.html for a possible XSS vector. –  Tom McKenzie Jan 30 at 6:07

try http://json2html.com/ that's a good way to Transform JSON to HTML.

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This doesn't answer my question –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 9:52
    
I believe that mahmoud is saying use a templating engine like json2html to dynamically convert your JSON feed into html WHEN you need it. So do something like this .. embed the JSON inside a nice script tag during your server page load then use json2html to convert images (when needed) into actual 'img' elements. –  Chad Brown Jan 19 '13 at 1:56

Didn't ever hear of any standards like that, but Knockout.js uses this type of syntax to embed HTML templates into page (and prevent them from rendering). So, I guess it's okay.

Also, JSON is actually a javascript, but you can't write

<script id="data" type="application/javascript">
    {
        "foo" : "bar"
    }
</script>

Because Javascript parser will try to parse a code block { } instead of an object literal, and throw the syntax error.

But what you can do is add something like document.imageData = before the literal.

This way you'll get already parsed and validated data that is immediately available to all javascript code at document.imageData. (Javascript code accessing this variable should be either below the embedded data, or run after the page is loaded.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the Knockout example. The example in my question works without errors. Also take note I'm using application/json as described here. –  TJ. Jan 18 '13 at 10:56
    
Yes, I understand your approach. I just wanted to point out that in case of embedded JSON, you can make use of browser's Javascript engine to parse and validate the data as well as store it in an accessible place. –  Gman Jan 18 '13 at 11:02

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