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I want to find the word immediately after a particular word in a string using a regex. For example, if the word is 'my',

"This is my prayer"- prayer

"this is my book()"- book

Is it possible using regex?

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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The regex would be

(?<=\bmy\s+)\p{L}+

\p{L}+ is a sequence of letters. The \p{L} is a Unicode code point with the property "Letter", so it matches a letter in any language.

(?<=\bmy\s+) is a lookbehind assertion, that ensures thet word "my" is before

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+1; added a word boundary so you don't match army surplus :) –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 18 '13 at 9:28
    
@TimPietzcker, thanks. –  stema Jan 18 '13 at 9:29
    
Thanks a ton!!! –  user1989583 Jan 22 '13 at 10:00
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You can use

my\s+\b(\w+)\b

This captures the word after my in the first subgroup.

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For my, use the following regex:

my (\w+)
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If my is taken from user input,

static string GetWordAfter(string word, string phrase)
{
    var pattern = @"\b" + Regex.Escape(word) + @"\s+(\w+)";
    return Regex.Match(phrase, pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase).Groups[1].Value;
}

...

string wordAfterMy = GetWordAfter("my", "this is my book()"); // gives book

This will return an empty string if there is no match.

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Use a look ahead REGEX:

(?<=my )\b\w+\b
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"this is my prayer"

.* (my )(\D*)( ).*

group2 in result will your word "prayer"

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You use many unnecessary groups, OK, but why do you use \D, which is "Not a digit" ? What have digits to do with matching words? –  stema Jan 18 '13 at 10:02
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