Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use a CMS which utilizes TinyMCE editor as a visual editor. Its CSS is weirdly edited so that ul-lists won't show bullets and paragraphs don't have any space between one another.

Is there a simple and convenient way to change the appearance that is defined in a specific CSS file on a server I don't have access to? I need to override these attributes in www.site.com/global.css:

ul { list-style-type: square; }
p { margin: 10 px; }

I believe there is an easy way to do it with Greasemonkey but I'm no good with scripting. Oh, and I'm using Google Chrome.

share|improve this question
    
Add your stylesheet after global.css and apply styles you want in your css. –  Morpheus Jan 18 '13 at 9:35
    
I don't have access to files on the server. Otherwise I might as well just edit the global.css. I need a way to override the css –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 9:38
1  
Have you tried Stylish? –  Pumbaa80 Jan 18 '13 at 9:40
    
I have but to no avail. Here's what I did body#tinymce, .mceContentBody ul {list-style-type:square !important; } –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 9:54
    
for some reason, Stylish doesn't affect TinyMCE css at all –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

Attributes added to the tag inline should override previously loaded stylesheet declarations.

<p style="margin:0px;"></p>

should override any p-margin styling in global.css

share|improve this answer
    
well, the output of TinyMCE-edited text looks just fine, it's just that I want to be able to edit text convenietly in the editor window. I mean, the visual part of the editor itself is incorrect because of the css that it uses. –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 10:00
    
Oh okay, I get your problem then... If you're the only one who uses the editor, I'd say some browser fix script - i.e. greasemonkey - might actually do the trick, but sadly I know very little about that. –  Brian Emilius Jan 18 '13 at 10:06
    
Yeah,that's exactly what I'm trying to figure out – how to setup Greasemonkey or any other kind of browser fix so that it would do the trick. –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 10:10
    
Greasemonkey could do it, but that's Firefox. For Chrome, use a straight userscript or use Tampermonkey. However (1), Stylish is the easiest smartest way to accomplish this (usually), in either browser. However (2), the OP has not specified enough detail for us to provide any more guidance. We need to know the exact HTML and CSS in question. –  Brock Adams Jan 18 '13 at 10:10
    
dj-store.ru/css/global.css here's a css file I need to have altered. Specifically, second line * { margin: 0; padding: 0; } should be * { margin: 10; padding: 0; } and ul { list-style: none; } should be ul { list-style: disc; } –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 10:19

on your css file use !important

ul { list-style-type: square !important; }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't have access to the file or any other file on the server, I need some kind of browser trick. –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 10:10
    
you got only what? –  fesh Jan 18 '13 at 11:29
    
access to the CMS, that's all –  maximrrrr Jan 21 '13 at 8:14
    
and you don't have access to the TInyMCE theme? –  fesh Jan 21 '13 at 10:04

Because you use TinyMCE you will need to have your CSS file loaded into the TinyMCE iframes head and not into your main page.

Use the content_css setting for this. It's a way to overwrite TinyMCE default CSS.

Update: Without access to the server files nor TinyMCE configuration you still have access to the TinyMCE API. Have a look at this options to load the CSS to where you need it. You should place your CSS file someplace on the internet/intranet where you can access it.

// Loads a CSS file dynamically into the current document
tinymce.DOM.loadCSS('somepath/some.css');

// Loads a CSS file into the currently active editor instance
tinyMCE.activeEditor.dom.loadCSS('somepath/some.css');

// Loads a CSS file into an editor instance by id
tinyMCE.get('someid').dom.loadCSS('somepath/some.css');

// Loads multiple CSS files into the current document
tinymce.DOM.loadCSS('somepath/some.css,somepath/someother.css');

Update2: It is possible to load a CSS string into the iframe head. For this use something like the following userscript:

// ==UserScript==
// @name    YOUR_SCRIPT_NAME
// @match   http://YOUR_SERVER.COM/YOUR_PATH/*
// ==/UserScript==

var css_to_add = 'p { margin: 10 px; }'; // example
var iframe_id = 'your_editor_id' + '_ifr'; // place your editor id here+'_ifr'
with(document.getElementById(iframe_id).contentWindow) {
    var h = document.getElementsByTagName("head");
    if (!h.length) return;
    var newStyleSheet = document.createElement("style");
    newStyleSheet.type = "text/css";
    h[0].appendChild (newStyleSheet);
    try {
        if ( typeof newStyleSheet.styleSheet !== "undefined" ) {
            newStyleSheet.styleSheet.cssText = css_to_add;
        }
        else {
            newStyleSheet.appendChild( document.createTextNode ( css_to_add ) );
            newStyleSheet.innerHTML = css_to_add;
        }
    }
    catch(e){}
}


Save the code as MyCSSFix.user.js and install it in Chrome per these instructions (after editing the indicated spots for your details).

share|improve this answer
    
Correct. Also, I forgot to mention that TinyMCE is in iFrame with src as javascript –  maximrrrr Jan 18 '13 at 10:05
    
see my updated post –  Thariama Jan 18 '13 at 10:14
1  
Still no good, client side, unless OP has a server (or wants to write a full-fledged extension). Is there a function that will accept a full CSS string, instead of a file? (couldn't find one in a very quick search). Then that would be user-scriptable. –  Brock Adams Jan 18 '13 at 10:25
1  
@Thariama, I edited your answer to show you. The OP could theoretically install that script in Chrome and be good to go. In practice, it needs details the OP has not provided and probably needs AJAX/timing compensation. –  Brock Adams Jan 18 '13 at 11:18
1  
You would use that style with Stylish, not Tampermonkey or as an extension. However, Chrome does not handle all iframes properly. Hence the need for more involved techniques. This answer's "Update 2" approach should work, but you need to tune it for your exact target page/site. –  Brock Adams Jan 18 '13 at 20:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.