Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The problem is that I have an old web service library that has a hashtable of global options which it combines with hashtable of request options. I cann't influence request code, but I can set the global hashtable. And I was just curious if there is a simple way to implement an extention to Hashtable class that will perform a callback for some of the key to read some thread-local variable instead of its original value?

EDIT: I forgot to mention that I'm bound to JDK 1.4.2.

share|improve this question
3  
Can you change the Hashtable object or only its contents? –  Kathy Van Stone Sep 17 '09 at 15:44
    
Yes, I can change Hashtable object. –  Andrey Adamovich Sep 18 '09 at 7:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can create a new class that derives from Hashtable and override the get() method.

Building on the code of twolfe18:

public class MyHashMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {
  TheadLocal special = new TheadLocal ();

  public MyHashMap<K, V>() {
    super();
  }

  public V get(K key) {
    if ("special".equals (key))
       return special.get ();

    return super.get(key);
  }
}

To set the value, use map.special.set(value). The value will be different per thread.

share|improve this answer
    
That's obvious, but how would it look like? And will the idea work? –  Andrey Adamovich Sep 17 '09 at 15:37
    
Yes, it should work. For implementation see my answer (didn't mean to poach though, give Aaron the credit). –  twolfe18 Sep 17 '09 at 15:48

the formatting came out terrible in a comment on Aaron's response so here it is:

public class MyHashMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {

  public MyHashMap<K, V>() {
    super();
  }

  public V get(K key) {
    // check the key or whatever you need to do
    V value = super.get(key);
    // check the value or whatever you need to do
    return value;
  }

}
share|improve this answer

Here is the code I used eventually:

package util;

import java.util.Hashtable;

public class SingleThreadLocalHashtable extends Hashtable {

    /**	Class version. */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    private ThreadLocal holder = new ThreadLocal();

    private String specialKey;

    public SingleThreadLocalHashtable(String specialKey) {
    	super();
    	this.holder.set(null);
    	this.specialKey = specialKey;
    }

    public synchronized Object get(Object key) {
    	if ((specialKey != null) && specialKey.equals(key)) {
    		return holder.get();
    	}
    	return super.get(key);
    }

    public synchronized Object put(Object key, Object value) {
    	if ((specialKey != null) && specialKey.equals(key)) {
    		holder.set(value);
    	}
    	return super.put(key, value);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.