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I am new to SQL, so I’m not sure which approach is best for this kind of task:

I have a table where groups of rows all relate to the same item, whose name appears in the first column. Other details appear in the other columns. I am trying to retrieve all rows for every group based on having the same value in the first column, where every time a certain value appears in one column, another value appears in a different column in the following row.

 | Fruit  | Value1| Value2|
 --------------------------
 | APPLE  |  A    |       |
 | APPLE  |       | E     |
 | PEAR   |  A    |       |
 | PEAR   |       | X     |
 | FIG    |       | X     |
 | FIG    |  A    |       |
 | CHERRY |  A    |       |
 | CHERRY |       | X     |
 | CHERRY |  A    |       |
 | CHERRY |       | X     |
 | GRAPE  |       | X     |
 | GRAPE  |       | T     |
 | ORANGE |  A    |       |
 | ORANGE |       | X     |
 | ORANGE |       | Y     |
 | ORANGE |       | Z     |
 | PEACH  |  B    |       |
 | PEACH  |  A    |       |
 | PEACH  |       | X     |
 | MANGO  |  B    |       |
 | MANGO  |  C    |       |
 | MANGO  |  D    |       |

From the above table, I would like to select all rows for a given Fruit, where Value1 is A on one row, Value2 is X on the following row, and nothing other than A appears in Value1 on any row for that Fruit.

From the above table, the query should deliver results that look like this:

 | Fruit  | Value1| Value2|
 --------------------------
 | PEAR   |  A    |       |
 | PEAR   |       | X     |
 | CHERRY |  A    |       |
 | CHERRY |       | X     |
 | CHERRY |  A    |       |
 | CHERRY |       | X     |
 | ORANGE |  A    |       |
 | ORANGE |       | X     |
 | ORANGE |       | Y     |
 | ORANGE |       | Z     |
  • APPLE is excluded because on the row after the one where Value1=A, Value2!=X.
  • FIG is excluded because Value2=X occurs on the row before Value1=A, instead of the row after.
  • GRAPE is excluded because there is no row where Value1=A.
  • PEACH is excluded because there is at least one row where Value1!=A.
  • MANGO is excluded because there is no row were Value1=A, and because there is no row where Value2=X.

The part that seems a bit tricky to me is performing several checks at the level of the group of rows, but still returning all the rows of the matching group.

Thanks in advance for tips and suggestions. Let me know if you need me to clarify the question. The database is DB2 V10 on z/OS.

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1  
What does "the next row" mean? That is, what are you ordering by to get the order you see? For example if you had the three rows in the following order ((PEAR,A,NULL),(PEAR,NULL,Y),(PEAR,NULL,X)) you would not want PEAR to be returned, correct? –  lc. Jan 18 '13 at 10:41
    
That is correct. For this selection, every time A appears in Value1, X must appear in Value2 of the very next row in the table. –  mlowry Jan 18 '13 at 11:28
    
One more clarification that probably changes the query significantly: Two or more consecutive instances of A in Value1 would be ok. So ((PEAR,A,NULL),(PEAR,A,NULL),(PEAR,NULL,X)) would be ok. I haven’t actually seen instances of that in the table, but I can imagine that they exists. In such cases, I would want to retrieve all PEAR rows. In summary: for a group of any number of consecutive (<fruit>,A,NULL) rows, the next row that is not (<fruit>,A,NULL) should be (<fruit>,NULL,X). –  mlowry Jan 18 '13 at 11:36
    
To your question about row ordering: The table is already ordered by groups where the value in the first column is the same. It is possible that multiple groups with the same name appear at different locations in the table, but in these cases there is another column (not mentioned) that I can use to be more specific. –  mlowry Jan 18 '13 at 11:38
1  
If you want to impose an order on rows in a database table, you should have another column with the rows' ordinal numbers. It's bad practice to treat database rows as having a certain order simply based on the order in which they were inserted. –  JLRishe Jan 18 '13 at 13:44
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Except for the FIG (in your example), which requires an order column (id or whatever), the query bellow solves your problem:

select * from fruits 
where fruit not in (select fruit from fruits where value1 is not null and value1 <> '' and value1 <> 'A')
and exists (select fruit from fruits f2 where f2.fruit = fruits.fruit and value2 = 'X')
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Thanks for your reply. As I see it, this query is based on the following assumptions: 1. The cases where Value2=X precedes Value1=A will be few, or will be handled in another way (e.g., your FIG comment). 2. Within the groups, the items already appear in the desired-for output order. I see how it should work, but I am not sure that the condition (where f2.fruit = fruits.fruit) is specific enough. If fruits is the name of the DB table, this comparison will always be true. I think you meant to compare the column in the inner select with that in the outer select. –  mlowry Jan 19 '13 at 9:11
    
Here is my modification: select * from fruits f1 where fruit not in (select fruit from fruits where value1 is not null and value1 <> '' and value1 <> 'A') and exists (select fruit from fruits f2 where f2.fruit = f1.fruit and value2 = 'X') –  mlowry Jan 19 '13 at 9:12
    
I tested this query this morning, and believe it gets me close enough to what I seek. At this point, I just need a ballpark number of rows that fit the aforementioned criteria. Later on, I might need to revisit this and get more exact results. Thanks again for the reply! –  mlowry Jan 21 '13 at 10:38
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