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It's quiet right that we should never override the start method of a thread but I was just practicing java when I was confused with two different behaviors..... I'm trying to override start method of Thread class.Below is the code :

package myPackage;

public class MainThreadUsingThread extends Thread{  
    @Override  
    public void run() {  
        System.out.println("-run   in t1");  
        System.out.println("");  
    }  
    @Override  
    public void start() {

        System.out.println("in start in t1");
        super.start();
    }

    /*public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("hii");
        Thread t3=new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread());
        t3.start();
    }*/
}

class A11 {  
    public static void main(String[] args) {  
        System.out.println("hii");  
        Thread t1=new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread());  
        t1.start();
        Thread t2=new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {  
                System.out.println("run in t2");  
            }  
            @Override
            public void start() {

                System.out.println("in start in t2");
                super.start();
            }
        };
        t2.start();
    }
}

In case of Thread "t2", I'm getting the overridden start method but not in case of Thraed "t1". Plz help me come out of this confusion.

Also is there any way to do the same (override,as far as it is not a good practice) in case of runnable interface. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Your last question is not clear. –  assylias Jan 18 '13 at 11:02
    
You have a type in thread 1 - it also says "in start in t2"? I assume that is wrong? –  Jaco Van Niekerk Jan 18 '13 at 11:05
    
Subclassing Thread is a good way to confuse yourself. The number of ways this can result in strange behaviour means it is considered bad practice. You would implement a Runnable and wrap it with a Thread (or pass it to an ExecutorService) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 18 '13 at 11:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Thread t1=new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread());

Your new MainThreadUsingThread() is being used as Runnable (because Thread implements Runnable). The thread executes Runnable.run(), that's why you don't get the overriden start.

When Thread.start is called, it starts a new thread and call Thread.run in that new thread.

You should do this:

Thread t1=new MainThreadUsingThread();

In Thread, its run method starts the Runnable that is used to construct that Thread, or does nothing if no Runnable is used to construct it. If you extends Thread and override Thread.run, this effectively changed what the thread does.

If you use new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread()), this effectively call the constructor Thread(Runnable target) and constructs a new Thread. Just like doing this:

Thread t1=new Thread((Runnable)(new MainThreadUsingThread()))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Alvin for your quick and helpful response. –  Sushil Kumar Jan 18 '13 at 11:12

When you write:

Thread t1=new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread());

you are using your MainThreadUsingThread object as a Runnable, not a Thread (Thread implements Runnable), and its start method is never called.

If you write:

Thread t1 = new MainThreadUsingThread();

You should get what you expect.

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Thanks @assylias for your quick and helpful response. –  Sushil Kumar Jan 18 '13 at 11:12

You wrote Thread t1=new Thread(new MainThreadUsingThread()); and t1 is not an object of MainThreadingUsingThread. It just calls the start() method of the new Thread and it then calls the run() method of MainThreadUsingThread.

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In terms of your second question:

It is not best practise to extend the Thread class. Rather use the Runnable interface, i.e.

Thread myThread = new Thread(new Runnable(){
   @Override
   public void run(){
   }
});

Of course, this is not the best approach, either. I really recommend that you have a look at the ExecutorService. This contains stuff such as pooling, so that new thread is not created every time. You simply submit jobs and they get done.

It also supports stuff like Futures, which makes for very elegant code, if used correctly.

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