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Let there be class NaturalFood and two classes inherit from this class; class Fruits and class Vegetables

 abstract class NaturalFood
{
    enum AllList
    {
        //empty list as a placeholder
    }

   protected string Name;
}

class Fruits : NaturalFood 
{
    enum AllList
    {
        Apple = 1,
        Banana = 2
    }
}

class Vegetables : NaturalFood
{
    enum AllList
    {
        Carrot = 1,
        Potatoes = 2
    }

}

I want to enforce that any class derived from class NaturalFood must declare and/or override the AllList enumeration. Effectively the enumeration will contain list specific to the derived class. How do I do this ?

Edit: My basic requirement is that each class deriving from a base class must have its own list of "something" that is specific to it. Enumeration is just a way of creating a list. I hope you get the gist from my example. I want to take advantage of what Enumeration offers viz. intellisense, toString() etc.

Edit2: Isn't my example very practical enough ? If I put the entire enumeration in the base class (NaturalFood), how do I know which of the enumerated values are specific to which derived class ? Let us say each derived class is "publishing something" it has to offer in form of enumerated constants and I want to enforce this constraint on every derived class. So in other words, my question is how to enforce a constraint on derived class like in scenario described here ?

share|improve this question
3  
This is not possible. An enumeration is a type, not a member of your class. Overriding has no sense in this case. Please describe your requirement. There's probably some proper way to achieve it. –  Steve B Jan 18 '13 at 11:07
    
Enum are constants, so they cannot have their own definition per subclass! –  Nasmi Sabeer Jan 18 '13 at 11:13
    
@SteveB, I have described my requirement in the edit of my original post –  devanalyst Jan 18 '13 at 11:25

2 Answers 2

This is not possible because enums are types, not class members... and the fact they are declared inside a class doesn't make them members of that class, they are just nested. Every class can and has to define it's own private enum AllList type... so your actual code is the only possible way to go. If you want to obtain something like this and you have only few values to deal with, stick with properties overrides:

class A
{
    public virtual String Value
    {
        get
        {
            return "A";
        }
    }
}

class B : A
{
    public override String Value
    {
        get
        {
            return "B";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
On top, Enums have no inheritance hierarchy. Case close, the poster basically was very ccareful to move himself into an area that is not supported by the language. –  TomTom Jan 18 '13 at 11:16
    
@TomTom, My main concern is trying to enforce a kind of "rule". Enumeration just happens to a way I have chose create a "list". I am not posting for brownie points. I have some serious stuff here behind my simple example. –  devanalyst Jan 18 '13 at 11:23
    
@Zarathos, That does not give me benefits that I can get from using Enumeration. –  devanalyst Jan 18 '13 at 11:29
2  
Of course it doesn't... but trust me, there is really no way to override a private enum. Another approach, unless enum members values are important in your code, would ge to declare only one common enum covering all of the possible cases. Or use flag enums so you can combine them. –  Zarathos Jan 18 '13 at 11:30

Actually, there's no sense to override these values. Actually, the advantages of override is that you can call a method of a derived class without knowing the derived class itself.

For example :

static void Main()
{
    NaturalFood food = GetSomeFood(); // At this point, we don't know the actual type
    food.SomeMethodInBaseClass(); // ok

}

static NaturalFood GetSomeFood()
{
     if(somecondition) {
         return new Fruits();
     } 
     else{
         return new Vegetables();
     }
}

public abstract class NaturalFood
{
     public abstract void SomeMethodInBaseClass();
}

public class Fruits : NaturalFood 
{       
   public override void SomeMethodInBaseClass(){
        Console.WriteLine("I'm a fruit");
    }
}

public class Vegetables : NaturalFood
{    
    public override void SomeMethodInBaseClass(){
         Console.WriteLine("I'm a vegetable");
    }   
}

No imagine what you wanted to do. In the main method, try to call the AllList :

static void Main()
{
    NaturalFood food = GetSomeFood(); // At this point, we don't know the actual type
    food.SomeMethodInBaseClass(); // ok
    food.AllList.XXXX; // What? it won't compile
}

This won't compile. The compiler has no way to know the actual derived class to infer the available enumeration values.

However, if you remove the enumeration from the base type, this will works :

static void Main()
{
    NaturalFood food = GetSomeFood(); // At this point, we don't know the actual type
    food.SomeMethodInBaseClass(); // ok

    Fruits f = new Fruits();
    Console.WriteLine(    f.AllList.Apple); // Ok

    Vegetable v = new Vegetable ();
    Console.WriteLine(    v.AllList.Potatoe); // Ok


}

But as you can see, you have to know explicitly the actual type, and thus, make the polymorphic useless.

[Edit] It's hard to answer to your second edit. Actually there are many many ways to validate such constraint. Without more context it may be difficult to answer. The most simple way I think, is to add to each derived class a overriden property that describe what kind of enumeration is accepted.

public enum NaturalFoodType {
    Unknown = 0,
    Apple= 1,
    Banana = 2,
    Potatoe = 3,
    Cucumber = 4
}
public abstract class NaturalFood
{
     public abstract void SomeMethodInBaseClass();
     public abstract IEnumerable<NaturalFoodType> AcceptedFoodType { get; }

     public bool IsValid(NaturalFoodType type){
          return AcceptedFootType.Contains(type);
     }
}

public class Fruits : NaturalFood 
{       
    public override void SomeMethodInBaseClass(){
        Console.WriteLine("I'm a fruit");
    }
    public override NaturalFoodType {
        get {
             yield return NaturalFoodType.Apple;
             yield return NaturalFoodType.Banana;
        }
    }
}

public class Vegetables : NaturalFood
{    
    public override void SomeMethodInBaseClass(){
         Console.WriteLine("I'm a vegetable");
    } 
    public override NaturalFoodType {
        get {
             yield return NaturalFoodType.Potatoe;
             yield return NaturalFoodType.Cucumber;
        }
    }  
}

But honestly, it start to add a lot of plumbing code, that become quite unreadable. You should consider the problem at a higher scope to find an acceptable solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the example. Makes sense. I have now tried to describe my requirement in more concise terms in "edit2" above. –  devanalyst Jan 18 '13 at 13:32
    
look at my edit –  Steve B Jan 18 '13 at 13:41

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