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I need to write a quick and easy port forwarder. At the moment it accepts connections and can read from clients just fine, but it doesn't get anything from the local machine it is running on. (FYI this was made to forward a webserver, because I can't find the app I usually use to forward VS2010/2012 to the network so I made my own).

I know the exception swallowing and such is bad but that's not important right now, I can deal with that later.

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;

public class SocketForward {
  int src = 0;
  int dest = 0;
  public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
    if (args.length < 2) {
      System.out.println("Usage: java SocketForward <source port> <destination port>");
      System.exit(1);
    } else {
      new SocketForward().startRun(Integer.parseInt(args[0]), Integer.parseInt(args[1]));
    }
  }
  public void startRun(int src, int dest) throws Exception {
    try {
      this.src = src;
      this.dest = dest;
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
      System.out.println("Usage: java SocketForward <source port> <destination port>");
      System.exit(1);
    }
    ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(dest);
    System.out.println("Waiting for connections...");
    while (!server.isClosed()) {
      new ConnHandler(src, server.accept());
    }
  }
}

class ConnHandler implements Runnable {
  Socket clientSocket;
  Socket hostSocket;
  int hostport;
  Thread thread;
  BufferedOutputStream hostOut;
  BufferedOutputStream clientOut;
  BufferedInputStream hostIn;
  BufferedInputStream clientIn;
  public ConnHandler(int hostport, Socket clientSocket) {
    System.out.println("Connected to " + clientSocket.getInetAddress());
    this.clientSocket = clientSocket;
    this.hostport = hostport;
    this.thread = new Thread(this);
    thread.start();
  }
  @Override
  public void run() {
    try {
      hostSocket = new Socket("", hostport);
      System.out.println("Connected to localhost:" + hostport);
      hostOut = new BufferedOutputStream(hostSocket.getOutputStream());
      clientOut = new BufferedOutputStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());
      hostIn = new BufferedInputStream(hostSocket.getInputStream());
      clientIn = new BufferedInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
      new Thread() {
        public void run() {
          while (this == Thread.currentThread()) {
            byte[] buf = new byte[8192];
            try {
              int len = 0;
              while ((len = ConnHandler.this.clientIn.read(buf)) > 0) {
                System.out.println("Client: " + new String(buf, 0, len));
                ConnHandler.this.hostOut.write(buf, 0, len);
              }
            } catch (Exception e) {
              e.printStackTrace();
              break;
            }
          }
        }
      }.start();
      new Thread() {
        public void run() {
          while (this == Thread.currentThread()) {
            byte[] buf = new byte[8192];
            try {
              int len = 0;
              while ((len = ConnHandler.this.hostIn.read(buf)) > 0) {
                System.out.println("Host: " + new String(buf, 0, len));
                ConnHandler.this.clientOut.write(buf, 0, len);
              }
            } catch (Exception e) {
              e.printStackTrace();
              break;
            }
          }
        }
      }.start();
    } catch (Exception e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are not doing any flushing, thereby introducing non-transparent man-in-the-middle behavior. This may well disturb the data flow as expected by the client and server.

A side note on code style: it is more convenient to have try-catch outside the while loop, so it breaks out automatically:

try {
  while (...) ...
} catch (Throwable t) {
   t.printStackTrace();
}

Note also Throwable instead of Exception—you'll want to know about any error that breaks your code, not just Exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't believe I forgot something so simple. Thanks. I'll accept as soon as I can. –  Logan Jan 18 '13 at 12:00
    
I'd say your use case can't benefit from buffered streams, so better use the raw ones. That doesn't mean you'll have to read byte by byte; the raw streams also support reading/writing a caller-supplied byte buffer. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 18 '13 at 12:02
    
Habit :) I just needed this for testing, and now it has served its purpose and can be put away somewhere safe on my hard drive. –  Logan Jan 18 '13 at 12:04
    
About the Throwable, that will also catch stuff like OutOfMemoryError which I can do nothing about in the code, really. Exception is sufficient to catch all the checked exceptions needed. –  Logan Jan 18 '13 at 12:06
    
Well, you can't (and don't) do anything about any exception, but you want to know it happened, not have your code mysteriously end. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 18 '13 at 12:07

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