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I'd like to know if there is a neat way to convert 1/2, 1/4, 5/8 into words (half, quarter, five eighths) using PHP.

I've got a product data feed, and need to create a clean URL for each product based on the name. Some have measurements like 1/4" and currently I swap out any non letter/numbers leaving me with "14" in this case. It would be more useful to convert this fraction into "quarter".

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A little more context perhaps? For eg. you need to replace them in a paragraph, or from some answer you get after calculations etc. –  hjpotter92 Jan 18 '13 at 12:28
    
Sure, I've updated the question to explain what I am doing with this. –  Alex Holsgrove Jan 18 '13 at 12:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there is no neat way to do this.

You'll need to

  • Implement an int-to-cardinal-string converter for the numerators
  • Modify this into an int-to-ordinal-string converter for the denominators ("third" instead of "three" etc. without also making "twenty-three" into "twentieth third")
  • Add some special cases ("second" -> "half", "fourth" -> "quarter" if you're not American... "first" -> ""?)
  • Optionally implement a simplifier so "2/4" => "half" not "two quarters"
  • Don't forget to pluralize your denominator if necessary!
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If you need to print two by five, one by four etc, I have a way.

  1. explode your number by "/". $nums= explode("/",$num)

  2. Use function in this link to convert digit to number,

$ones= convert_number_to_words($nums[0]);

$two=  convert_number_to_words($nums[1]);

Then, echo $ones."by".$two; Output.

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That does not give 'half' and 'quarter' –  Tuim Jan 18 '13 at 12:37
1  
This is what I was thinking about. I'd probably match [\d]\/[\d] and then split the numbers on the / and then work out how to add "th" and "nd" based on the last digit of the denominator. –  Alex Holsgrove Jan 18 '13 at 12:38
    
@Tuim I said it on first sentence. Since he needs to clean his url, I hope this fits. –  Vishnu Renku Jan 18 '13 at 12:39
    
It's sort of in the right direction, but doesn't give me the denominators that I need. (thirds / fifths, nineteenths) –  Alex Holsgrove Jan 21 '13 at 11:04

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