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I am trying to discern the difference between

if 
else 
else if

When do you use them and when not?

I have a homework assignment with a ton of instances and I am running into code error due to not knowing the differences between each.

Can someone please define how to use these?

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1  
You might also want to look up how to use a "case" statement as that is the other main conditional component in C and is worth contrasting to the if/else if/ else structure. –  JB King Sep 17 '09 at 16:35
    
Use them (they compromise the fundamental branch structure in most programming languages) -- then you will see what they do, how they work, and what they are useful for. –  user166390 Dec 22 '10 at 7:45

14 Answers 14

up vote 14 down vote accepted
**IF** you are confused
 read the c# spec
**ELSE IF** you are kind of confused
 read some books
**ELSE**
 everything should be OK.

:)

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An if statement follows this sort of structure:

if (condition)
{
    // executed only if "condition" is true
}
else if (other condition)
{
    // executed only if "condition" was false and "other condition" is true
}
else
{
    // executed only if both "condition" and "other condition" were false
}

The if portion is the only block that is absolutely mandatory. else if allows you to say "ok, if the previous condition was not true, then if this condition is true...". The else says "if none of the conditions above were true..."

You can have multiple else if blocks, but only one if block and only one (or zero) else blocks.

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4  
Just to be clear for the OP: one and only one of the statement blocks will be executed during a pass through a group of if/else statements. So if both condition and other condition are true, only condition's code will be executed. –  fbrereto Sep 17 '09 at 16:33
    
@fbrerto: Good point, thanks! –  Adam Robinson Sep 17 '09 at 16:37
    
ah so if you have multiple choices inside an if, then you use the else if? –  HollerTrain Sep 17 '09 at 16:38
7  
FYI: There's really no such thing as an "else if". It's just an else statement which contains an if statement. –  Pod Sep 17 '09 at 16:49
1  
@pod: semantically you're correct, but it's still an important idea to learn about. –  Adam Robinson Sep 17 '09 at 16:52

If-elseif-else can be written as a nested if-else. These are (logically speaking) equivalent:

if (A) 
{
    doA();
}
else if (B)
{
    doB();
}
else if (C)
{
    doC();
}
else
{
    doX();
}

is the same as:

if (A) 
{
    doA();
}
else
{
    if (B)
    {
        doB();
    }
    else
    {
         if (C)
         {
             doC();
         }
         else
         {
             doX();
         }
    }
}

The result is that ultimately only one of doA, doB, doC, or doX will be evaluated.

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5  
I'm glad someone pointed out else if isn't a keyword, and just a formatted combination of else and if –  GManNickG Sep 17 '09 at 16:42
1  
Agreed GMan, this isn't Python, Perl, VB etc. There's only if and else here. –  Pod Sep 17 '09 at 16:50

If, else and else if are all constructs to help 'branch' code. Basically, you employ them whenever you want to make a decision.

An example would be 'if it's sunny, I'll go outside. otherwise, I'll stay inside'

In code (ignoring the extra stuff)

if (sunny) {
  goOutside();
}
else {
  stayInside();
}

You CAN use 'else if' statements if you want to add 'additional' conditions. Extending the previous example, "if it's sunny, I'll go outside. If it's stormy, I'll go into the basement otherwise I'll stay inside"

In code

if (sunny) {
  goOutside();
}
else if (stormy) {
  goDownstairs();
}
else {
  stayInside();
}

EDIT section:

Here is how you can write multiple ifs as and conditions. The following example can be written in at least two ways:

'If it's sunny and warm, go outside. If it's sunny and cold, do nothing'

if (sunny) {
   if (warm) {
     goOutside();
   }
   else if (cold) {
     doNothing();
   }
}

OR

if (sunny && warm) {
   goOutside();
}
else if (sunny && cold) {
   doNothing();
}
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2  
+1 for using real-world concepts rather than just placeholders like condition or a, b, etc. –  Grant Wagner Sep 17 '09 at 17:07
    
+1 for real-world concepts. How would you define the following, as this is where I am running into issues: if it's sunny go outside. if it's sunny go to park. if it's sunny go to the store. if it's sunny go to the discoteck. if it's stormy go downstairs. if it's stormy go in the living room. if it's stormy go into the parlor. if it's stormy go into your bedroom. –  HollerTrain Sep 17 '09 at 17:19
    
the multiple ifs inside the main if is where i am having trouble –  HollerTrain Sep 17 '09 at 17:20
    
Ifs within ifs can be rewritten using 'ands' For example, if you want to write 'if it's sunny and warm, go outside' and 'if it's sunny and cold, do nothing' you can write it either as: if (sunny) { if (warm) { goOutside(); } else if (cold) { doNothing(); } } OR if (sunny && warm) { goOutside(); } else if (sunny && cold) { doNothing(); } I'll edit and add these examples in. –  Malaxeur Sep 17 '09 at 18:07
    
that most definitely didn't format properly. please see the answer's edit section instead :P –  Malaxeur Sep 17 '09 at 18:08

There's no "else if". You have the following:

if (condition)
    statement or block

Or:

if (condition)
    statement or block
else
    statement or block

In the first case, the statement or block is executed if the condition is true (different than 0). In the second case, if the condition is true, the first statement or block is executed, otherwise the second statement or block is executed.

So, when you write "else if", that's an "else statement", where the second statement is an if statement. You might have problems if you try to do this:

if (condition)
    if (condition)
        statement or block
else
    statement or block

The problem here being you want the "else" to refer to the first "if", but you are actually referring to the second one. You fix this by doing:

if (condition)
{
    if (condition)
        statement or block
} else
    statement or block
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2  
It is precisely this problem, known as the "dangling ELSE" problem and first seen in PASCAL (or possibly ALGOL), long before C was developed, that caused Jean Ichbiah and his team to adopt the fully-bracketed style for control structures in Ada. –  John R. Strohm Sep 17 '09 at 17:01
    
+1 For there is no "else if" statement. There's an if statement comprised of a statement when true and [optionally] a statement when false. The developer can take advantage of the statement when false to check a new condition, and since this is an ubiquitous case it's become known as simply the "else if". –  280Z28 Sep 17 '09 at 17:22

Dead Simple Pseudo-Code Explanation:

/* If Example */
if(condition_is_true){
   do_this
}
now_do_this_regardless_of_whether_condition_was_true_or_false

/*  If-Else Example  */
if(condition_is_true){
    do_this
}else{
    do_this_if_condition_was_false
}
now_do_this_regardless_of_whether_condition_was_true_or_false

/* If-ElseIf-Else Example */
if(condition_is_true){
    do_this
}else if(different_condition_is_true){
    do_this_only_if_first_condition_was_false_and_different_condition_was_true
}else{
    do_this_only_if_neither_condition_was_true
}
now_do_this_regardless_of_whether_condition_was_true_or_false
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what if you have additional conditions inside the <code>else if(different_condition_is_true){ do_this_only_if_first_condition_was_false_and_different_condition_was_true }</code> I need to allow? –  HollerTrain Sep 17 '09 at 17:39
    
do_this_only_if_first_condition_was_false_and_different_condition_was_true could be replaced with whatever you want, if replaced with a nested if(condition){do_this} it will behave accordingly. –  JStriedl Sep 17 '09 at 18:55

I think it helps to think of the "else" as the word OTHERWISE.

so you would read it like this:

if (something is true)
{
   // do stuff
}
otherwise if (some other thing is true)
{
   // do some stuff
}
otherwise
{
   // do some other stuff :)
}
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They mean exactly what they mean in English.

IF a condition is true, do something, ELSE (otherwise) IF another condition is true, do something, ELSE do this when all else fails.

Note that there is no else if construct specifically, just if and else, but the syntax allows you to place else and if together, and the convention is not to nest them deeper when you do. For example:

if( x )
{
    ...
}
else if( y )
{
    ...
}
else
{
    ...
}

Is syntactically identical to:

if( x )
{
    ...
}
else 
{
    if( y )
    {
        ...
    }
    else
    {
        ...
    }
}

The syntax in both cases is:

if *<statment|statment-block>* else *<statment|statment-block>*

and if is itself a statment, so that syntax alone supports the use of else if

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if (numOptions == 1)
    return "if";
else if (numOptions > 2)
    return "else if";
else 
    return "else";
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2  
I think you meant numOptions == 1 –  Nick Meyer Sep 17 '09 at 16:52
    
I'm so embarrassed... –  AShelly Sep 21 '09 at 4:54
if (condition)
{
  thingsToDo()..
} 
else if (condition2)
{
  thingsToDoInTheSecondCase()..
}
else
{
  thingsToDoInOtherCase()..
}
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The syntax of if statement is

if(condition)
    something; // executed, when condition is true
else
    otherthing; // otherwise this part is executed

So, basically, else is a part of if construct (something and otherthing are often compound statements enclosed in {} and else part is, in fact, optional). And else if is a combination of two ifs, where otherthing is an if itself.

if(condition1)
    something;
else if(condition2)
    otherthing;
else
    totallydifferenthing;
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The if statement uses the results of a logical expression to decide if one of two code blocks will be executed.

With this code

if (logical expression) {
    code block 1;
} else {
    code block 2;
}

if the logical expression is true, only the statements in code block 1 will be executed; if false, only the statements in code block 2.

In the case that there are multiple similar tests to be done (for instance if we are testing a number to be less than zero, equal to zero or more than zero) then the second test can be placed as the first statement of the else code block.

if (logical expression 1) {
    code block 1;
} else {
    if (logical expression 2) {
        code block 2;
    } else {
        code block 3;
    }
}

In this case, code block 1 is executed if logical expression 1 is true; code block 2 if logical expression 1 is false and logical expression 2 is true; code block 3 if both logical expressions are false.

Obviously this can be repeated with another if statement as the first statement of code block 3.

The else if statement is simply a reformatted version of this code.

if (logical expression 1) {
    code block 1;
} else if (logical expression 2) {
    code block 2;
} else {
    code block 3;
}
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The else if can be used in conjunction with 'if', and 'else' to further break down the logic

//if less than zero
if( myInt < 0){
      //do something
}else if( myInt > 0 && myInt < 10){
//else if between 0 and 10      
      //do something
}else{
//else all others  
      //do something
}
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Those are the basic decision orders that you have in most of the programming language; it helps you to decide the flow of actions that your program is gonna do. The if is telling the compiler that you have a question, and the question is the condition between parenthesis

if (condition) {
    thingsToDo()..
}

the else part is an addition to this structure to tell the compiler what to do if the condition is false

if (condition) {
    thingsToDo()..
} else {
    thingsToDoInOtherCase()..
}

you can combine those to form a else if which is when the first condition is false but you want to do another question before to decide what to do.

if (condition) {
    thingsToDo()..
} else if (condition2) {
    thingsToDoInTheSecondCase()..
}else {
    thingsToDoInOtherCase()..
}
share|improve this answer
    
in the last ex are u missing a } to close out the else if? –  HollerTrain Sep 17 '09 at 18:29

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