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The enum I've created looks like this:

enum MonthOfTheYear : byte
{
    January,
    February,
    March,
    April,
    May,
    June,
    July = 0,
    August,
    September,
    October,
    November,
    December
}

As you can see, July has an initializer of 0. This has some interesting (side) effects: there seems to be "pairing" of integer values. February ànd August now have values of 1, March ànd September have 2 etc.:

MonthOfTheYear theMonth = MonthOfTheYear.February;
Console.WriteLine(theMonth + " has integer value of " + (int)theMonth);

and

MonthOfTheYear theMonth = MonthOfTheYear.August;
Console.WriteLine(theMonth + " has integer value of " + (int)theMonth);

clearly show this. So far, weird as I find that, I'm willing to go along. EDIT: I get that assigning July 0 makes the indices start over. I DON'T get why they can co-exist within the same enum.

BUT! IF I then loop through the enum and output all the underlying integer values, weirdness ensues.

MonthOfTheYear theMonth = MonthOfTheYear.January;

for (int i = 0; i < 12; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(theMonth + " has integer value of " + (int)theMonth++);
}

outputs

July has integer value of 0
February has integer value of 1
September has integer value of 2
April has integer value of 3
May has integer value of 4
June has integer value of 5
6 has integer value of 6
7 has integer value of 7
8 has integer value of 8
9 has integer value of 9
10 has integer value of 10
11 has integer value of 11

I was hoping someone could explain to me what's going on behind the scenes, because the integer values are successive, so I'm thinking this is outputting as expected but I'm not seeing it as of yet.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.getname.aspx

If multiple enumeration members have the same underlying value, the GetName method guarantees that it will return the name of one of those enumeration members. However, it does not guarantee that it will always return the name of the same enumeration member. As a result, when multiple enumeration members have the same value, your application code should never depend on the method returning a particular member's name.

So, to sum it up, when you have multiple members with the same value, the name you get for a particular value is any of the members with that value.

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although, truth be told, I didn't use the GetName() method... –  Wim Ombelets Jan 18 '13 at 13:05
    
That doesn't matter. Your program only stores the byte value of your enum. Everything else is deduced from the enum type, based on the byte value. –  Alex Jan 18 '13 at 13:07

Firstly, when you specify a value in the definition of an enum, subsequent values number consecutively from there - and even if you specify 0 somewhere, the first value will start numbering from 0. Thus your underlying byte values are:

enum MonthOfTheYear : byte
{
    January = 0, // not specified, so starts at 0
    February = 1,
    March = 2,
    April = 3,
    May = 4,
    June = 5,
    July = 0, // specified, so starts numbering from 0 again
    August = 1,
    September = 2,
    October = 3,
    November = 4,
    December = 5
}

When you increment an enum value with ++, it just increments the underlying byte - it doesn't look at the definition of the enum and go to the element on the next line!

If this byte doesn't have a corresponding defined entry, that doesn't mean it's invalid at all - just that, when you convert the enum value to a string, you get the byte value as a string.

If the byte has several corresponding defined entries... Actually, I'm not sure exactly which entry converting it to a string will give you, but it's clearly not necessarily the first one.

Basically MonthOfTheYear.February == MonthOfTheYear.August so whether you're calling ToString on it or just looking at it in the debugger, there's no guarantee that one won't get switched for the other.

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ok, thanks. That much seemed to be apparent. But how does that explain the jumping around the months...? And where did March go? –  Wim Ombelets Jan 18 '13 at 12:50
    
While everything is true, it doesn't explain why ((MonthOfTheYear)1).ToString() returns February and ((MonthOfTheYear)2).ToString() returns September –  ken2k Jan 18 '13 at 12:51
    
@Wim Good spot. It's picking September instead, since they both have the same value - I don't know the precise rules, but I've added that to my answer. –  Rawling Jan 18 '13 at 12:52

Use the method

Enum.GetName

Here is an example:

using System;

public class GetNameTest {
    enum Colors { Red, Green, Blue, Yellow };
    enum Styles { Plaid, Striped, Tartan, Corduroy };

    public static void Main() {

        Console.WriteLine("The 4th value of the Colors Enum is {0}", Enum.GetName(typeof(Colors), 3));
        Console.WriteLine("The 4th value of the Styles Enum is {0}", Enum.GetName(typeof(Styles), 3));
    }
}
// The example displays the following output:
//       The 4th value of the Colors Enum is Yellow
// 

You get an full explanation here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/system.enum.getname.aspx

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Sorry, I don't see how that answers my question. –  Wim Ombelets Jan 18 '13 at 12:51
    
I'm sorry, the article seems to answer that. My apologies ;) –  Wim Ombelets Jan 18 '13 at 13:01

You explicitly set july to be the first month in the enum. This messes things up. Try this:

enum MonthOfTheYear : byte {
        January,
        February,
        March,
        April,
        May,
        June,
        July,
        August,
        September,
        October,
        November,
        December
    }

for (int i = 0; i < 12; i++) {
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} has integer value of {1}", Enum.GetName(typeof(MonthOfTheYear), i), i));
}

Because you set july to zero it resets the indexer from that point. If you want this strange order to be in place, consider rearranging the order in your enum.

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