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I am currently learning how to use Tasks, async and await in Windows Store ("Metro") apps. I stumbled upon the property Task.CurrentId and try to understand how it works.

According to MSDN it returns "An integer that was assigned by the system to the currently-executing task". So I added logging this value to my custom logger, but to my surprise none of my test apps ever logged anything but null.

Look at this example:

private async void TestButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    int? id1 = Task.CurrentId;

    await Task.Delay(100);
    int? id2 = Task.CurrentId;

    StorageFolder folder = ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;
    StorageFile file = await folder.CreateFileAsync("test.txt", 
        CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);
    int? id3 = Task.CurrentId;

    await FileIO.AppendTextAsync(file, "test");
    int? id4 = Task.CurrentId;

    await DoMoreAsync();
    int? id7 = Task.CurrentId;
}

private async Task DoMoreAsync()
{
    StorageFolder folder = ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;
    StorageFile file = await folder.CreateFileAsync("test.txt",
        CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);
    int? id5 = Task.CurrentId;

    await FileIO.AppendTextAsync(file, "test");
    int? id6 = Task.CurrentId;
}

All these ids are null. Why? This code does create tasks, doesn't it? Shouldn't they have an id?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you're using async / await, all your Task.CurrentId calls are happening on the UI thread.

The UI thread is not a Task, so it has a null CurrentId


If you create a Task, its CurrentId will be set:

int? idTask = await Task.Run( () => Task.CurrentId );
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Aha. So the call to the implicitly created callback (for the code after await) is dispatched to the UI thread? –  Sebastian Negraszus Jan 18 '13 at 13:21
    
Yes, a custom windows message is posted to the message loop. When it is handled, the "continuation" is executed as a normal method on the UI thread. You can see the call stack if you set a break point after an await that yields. –  Nicholas Butler Jan 18 '13 at 13:28
    
So continuation is dispatched to UI thread, or to thread from which is initiated async task? Or there are way to configure task how manage continuation? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 18 '13 at 13:38

According to MSDN it returns "An integer that was assigned by the system to the currently-executing task" ... This code does create tasks, doesn't it? Shouldn't they have an id?

The key there is "currently-executing".

There are two types of Tasks: one type of task executes code, and the other type of task is just an abstract representation of some kind of operation or event. For examples, Task.Run will create a code-executing task that will execute its code on a thread pool thread; Task.Delay will create an operation/event task that completes when a timer fires.

The tasks returned by async methods represent the method itself, so they are actually an operation/event task instead of a code task. The code in async methods may run as delegates or as several different tasks (or a mixture of both). Even if you do get a CurrentId from within an async method (which indicates you're running inside a code-executing task), that id would be different than the id of the task returned by the method (which is always an operation/event task).

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is there an overview of these task/async internals somewhere? Thanks! –  MikeJansen Oct 31 at 19:22
1  
@MikeJansen: I describe the two types on my blog‌​, with another post specifically dealing with CurrentId. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 31 at 20:00

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