Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I still wait for the answer.

I need to view if someone is downloading a specific file at this moment. The initial problem: I would like to know when someone interrupts downloading the file.

The server configuration:

server 
{

    listen 80;
    server_name mysite.com;

    location /ugp/
    {
        alias /www/ugp/;
    }
    break;
}

A user can download files from http://mysite.com/ugp/, for example http://mysite.com/ugp/1.mp3.

UPDATE.

It's no so obviously how to do it analyzing access.log. Some browsers send 206 code when user stops downloading (Google Chrome) some not (HTC player, mobile application):

85.145.8.243 - - [18/Jan/2013:16:08:41 +0300] "GET /ugp/6.mp3 HTTP/1.1" 200 10292776 "-" "HTC Streaming Player htc_wwe / 1.0 / htc_ace / 2.3.5"
85.145.8.243 - - [18/Jan/2013:16:08:41 +0300] "GET /ugp/2.mp3 HTTP/1.1" 200 697216 "-" "HTC Streaming Player htc_wwe / 1.0 / htc_ace / 2.3.5"
85.145.8.243 - - [18/Jan/2013:16:09:44 +0300] "GET /ugp/7.mp3 HTTP/1.1" 200 4587605 "-" "HTC Streaming Player htc_wwe / 1.0 / htc_ace / 2.3.5"
share|improve this question
    
A /var/log/nginx/mysite-access.log analysis (last line tail -1 file) is not what you want? –  ring0 Jan 18 '13 at 12:52
    
@ring0 It's not obvously how to do it analyzing access log. See my update please. –  sergzach Jan 18 '13 at 13:15
add comment

2 Answers

In order to offer more flexibility, you can add a PHP server, and publish URLs like

  http://mysite.com/download.php?file=2.mp3

the download.php reads the file from its location (eg /var/www/files/2.mp3), having a suggested code. ( Headers )

<?php

  // Here you know precisely that a download is requested

  $path = '/home/var/www/files';
  $file = "$path/" . $_GET['file']; // check user input!
  $size = filesize($file);
  $read = 0;

  $state = 'downloading ' . $file;

  // echo headers for a binary file download 

  @ $f = fopen ($file, 'r');
  if ( $f ) {
    // Output 100 bytes in each iteration
    while (($chunk = fread($f, 100)) !== false) {
      // specify somewhere $state, still downloading
      echo $chunk;
      $read += strlen($chunk);
    }
    fclose ($f);
  }
  if ($read >= $size) 
    $state = 'done';
  else
    $state = 'fail';
?>

This is an exemple to provide an algorithm - not tested at all! But should be pretty close from a download code (usually readfile is used, but it reads the file one shot)

share|improve this answer
    
It's a good idea. Let me check it. –  sergzach Jan 18 '13 at 13:52
    
There is a lot of literature about how to install a nginx+php-fpm on Linux like this as PHP files needs a special recognition pattern and processing in nginx. –  ring0 Jan 18 '13 at 13:55
    
Thanks. It's not so important what programming language we use, isn't it? I understand your PHP code. –  sergzach Jan 18 '13 at 14:01
    
PHP is easier to implement and program. Of course, it would work also in Java, Perl or even C... –  ring0 Jan 18 '13 at 14:06
    
I do not understand (in your code) why we expect that fread returns false when a user interrupts downloading? The audio file is on a server and the function returns false only if it reaches the end of the file. –  sergzach Jan 18 '13 at 14:24
show 1 more comment

Have a look at the nginx extended status module.

share|improve this answer
    
Excuse me, I don't know how to use the module. I can't find the docs. Could you give me the reference? –  sergzach Jan 18 '13 at 13:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.