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i present you my problem

I've 2 list, named them A and B.

list<vector<int> > A = {{1},{2},{3}};
list<vector<int> > B = {{4},{5},{6}}; 

What i want is to have A = {{1,4},{1,5},{1,6},{2,4},{2,5},{2,6},{3,4},{3,5},{3,6}} without use any tmp list.

I use C++11 with gcc 4.6.3 on Ubuntu 12.04

So that the minimize code:

auto A_begin = A.begin();
auto A_end = A.end();
auto B_begin = B.begin();
auto B_end = B.end();

for(auto i = A_begin; i != A_end; ++i) //loop on A
{
    for (auto j = B_begin;j != B_end; ++j) //loop on B
    {
        vector<int> tmp = (*i); // A[i]
        copy((*j).begin(),(*j).end(),back_inserter(tmp)); // append B[j] to A[i]
        A.emplace_back(tmp); //add it to A
    }
}
A.erase(A_begin,A_end); // remove {1},{2},{3}

So, i think the algo is ok, but it make a infinit loop on A. That I think is that A_end change when i make a A.emplace_back, but i save it, so i realy don't know wat append here.

my code to identify the problem:

auto A_begin = A.begin();
auto A_end = A.end();
auto B_begin = B.begin();
auto B_end = B.end();

int ii = A.size();

for(auto i = A_begin; i != A_end; ++i) //loop on A
{
    for (auto j = B_begin;j != B_end; ++j) //loop on B
    {
        vector<int> tmp = (*i);
        A.emplace_back(tmp);
    }
    cout<<--ii<<endl; // exit when print 0 ?
}

This print negative number, and I've to ^C again.

EDIT : I find a solution:

auto A_begin = A.begin();
auto A_end =  A.end();
auto B_begin = B.begin();
auto B_end = B.end();

list<vector<int>> tmp_l;

for(auto i = A_begin; i != A_end; ++i) //loop on A
{
    for (auto j = B_begin;j != B_end; ++j) //loop on B
    {
        vector<int> tmp = (*i); // A[i]
        copy((*j).begin(),(*j).end(),back_inserter(tmp)); // append B[j] to A[i]
        tmp_l.emplace_back(move(tmp)); //add it to A
    }
}
 swap(tmp_l,A);
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

These two lines:

vector<int> tmp = (*i); // A[i]
copy((*j).begin(),(*j).end(),tmp.end()); // append B[j] to A[i]

will be invoking undefined behaviour. By copying to tmp.end() you are simply overwriting memory after the end of A[i], not extending A[i]. You need to use a back_insert iterator, something like:

vector<int> tmp = (*i); // A[i]
copy((*j).begin(), (*j).end(), back_inserter(tmp)); // append B[j] to A[i]

You'll also need to include the header to get the back_inserter.

EDIT: Also, the A_end iterator points to the position "past the end" of the list so no matter how many items you add to a they are always added in front of A_end, hence the infinite loop. I'm not sure if there's a good way to deal with this. There's no benefit here in not creating a temporary list, you are allocating the same memory either way, just write into a new list.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for back_inserter, but no change :/ –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 13:18
    
Yeah, I just saw the cause of the problem and added an edit. –  Steve Jan 18 '13 at 13:19
    
It was exactly what i suspected. But, the copy of a tmp list will be very long (i've a ton of object in it), so i try to not make copy of it. –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 13:22
    
The tmp list will not be a copy, it will be the list. Write the output into a new list, then use std::swap to swap the contents of A and tmp. This is a very cheap operation, it won't copy the contents just move a few pointers. Then when your function exits tmp will contain the old contents of A and be destructed. –  Steve Jan 18 '13 at 13:27
    
I add a Edit to post a solution to deal with this, without tmp. –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 13:28

Your algorithm is not good.

This :

copy((*j).begin(),(*j).end(),tmp.end());

will cause all kind of problems because you overwrite some random memory.

You probably wanted to do something like this to append :

vector<int> tmp = (*i);
copy((*j).begin(),(*j).end(),std::back_inserter(tmp));
share|improve this answer
    
Thx, but without usign copy, i've the same problem. –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 13:10
    
Calling reserve will not work. When the copy is done the vector will not have its size updated so you're writing past the end of the vector still. –  Steve Jan 18 '13 at 13:14

EDIT : I find a solution:

That solution is good, using a temporary vector and swapping it with A is better than doing it in place, because your original version (as well as copying past the end of the vectors) finished with an erase from the beginning which moves every element.

But your solution can be improved:

// get rid of these iterators, they're useless
/*
auto A_begin = A.begin();
auto A_end =  A.end();
auto B_begin = B.begin();
auto B_end = B.end();
*/

list<vector<int>> tmp_l;

// use new for loops
for (auto& a : A)
{
    for (auto& b : B)
    {
// use auto
        auto tmp = a; // A[i]
// I find just inserting at the end simpler than using `back_inserter`
        tmp.insert(tmp.end(), b.begin(), b.end()); // append B[j] to A[i]
// then clear it the moved-from elements:
        b.clear();
// move the tmp vector into place, do not copy it.
        tmp_l.emplace_back(std::move(tmp));
    }
}
swap(tmp_l,A);
share|improve this answer
    
Great, good idea to use move, but b is inside a loop, so, it's for first a, but not the others. –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 14:11
    
yes, i've take this parte ^^. –  Krozark Jan 18 '13 at 14:29

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