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Hi I'm trying to create a simple countdown.
Here is my code but it's not working.
Can you help me find the problem?

function count() {
    for (var cc=20,cc > 0,cc--) {
        document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML=cc;
    }
}
count();
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What is the problem? from what I see it can be either you lack a sleep of some sort or you have no element with id="coo", or the , instead of ; typo in the for loop. –  Ofir Farchy Jan 18 '13 at 13:21
    
The problem is his comma's instead of semi-colons in the for argument. Otherwise you are right, in this manner (without a 'sleep/pauze' like a recursive setInterval(f,t), the element cco will only have 0 visible. –  GitaarLAB Jan 18 '13 at 13:22
3  
@OfirFarchy, what JavaScript version are you using that it has sleep? ;) –  epascarello Jan 18 '13 at 13:23
    
@epascarello, correct :) language mixup, fixed the comment –  Ofir Farchy Jan 18 '13 at 13:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're using commas instead of semicolons.

for (var cc=20,cc > 0,cc--)

should be

for (var cc=20;cc > 0;cc--)

However, this probably won't do what you think it will, as the loop will count all the way to 0 immediately (so the user won't even see the countdown). I'm guessing you wanted something like:

var cc = 20;

var interval = setInterval(function()
{
    document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML = -- cc;

    if (cc == 0)
        clearInterval(interval);

}, 1000);

See setInterval and clearInterval for more information.

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1  
Looks like you need to add a clearInterval in case cc is 0. –  VisioN Jan 18 '13 at 13:23
    
Or you could use a recursive setTimeout that stops setting when cc is 0. –  mellamokb Jan 18 '13 at 13:23
1  
Yes, you're right - admittedly, I didn't test the code. Thanks! –  James McLaughlin Jan 18 '13 at 13:24
1  
@mellamokb Although in this situation it probably doesn't matter, I find setInterval is more precise with the interval than a recursive setTimeout. There's a good description of the difference here. –  James McLaughlin Jan 18 '13 at 13:29
    
thanks :)....... –  user1599537 Jan 18 '13 at 13:39

There are (at least) two mistakes.

The first is syntactical: In a for loop the parameters are separated by ; and not by ,. Syntactic correct code would look like this:

function count() {
  for (var cc=20;cc > 0;cc--) {
    document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML=cc;
 }
}

Second, you do not have a countdown, but override the very same element over and over again, without any time for the user to see the result.

A better approach would be to use setTimeout() here, which could look like this:

var cc = 20;
function count() {
  document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML=cc;
  if ( cc > 0 ) {
    setTimeout( count, 1000 );
  }
}

setTimeout( count, 1000 );

The setTimeout() approach leaves some time for the browser to actually render your modifications (and for the user to see it).

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+1 I prefer setTimeout. It's like using a Thorium nuclear reactor instead of a Uranium one. –  mellamokb Jan 18 '13 at 13:26
    
thanks :)....... –  user1599537 Jan 18 '13 at 13:38

Change ',' with ';' in your for loop

function count() {
  for (var cc=20;cc > 0;cc--) {
    document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML=cc
  }
}
count();
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thanks :)....... –  user1599537 Jan 18 '13 at 13:37

Another recursive version with setTimeout:

(function count(cc) {
  document.getElementById("cco").innerHTML = cc;
  if (cc > 0)
    setTimeout(function() { count(--cc); }, 1000);
})(10);

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/DgWgx/

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thanks :)....... –  user1599537 Jan 18 '13 at 13:40

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