Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Delete from array in javascript

I have the following JSON object:

[id:84,id:92,id:123,id:2353]

How would I go about removing the item which the value is "123" using javascript?

or if I formatted the json as

[84, 92, 123, 2353]

How would it be removed in this case?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Blazemonger, Ja͢ck, Lloyd, ithcy Jan 18 '13 at 15:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
The first string is not valid JSON, or even JavaScript for that matter. –  Pointy Jan 18 '13 at 14:08
1  
This is extremely confusing. Do you have actual json, as in, a string containing the serialized representation of a JavaScript array? Or do you just have a JavaScript array? Because that "JSON string" is not valid JSON. –  meagar Jan 18 '13 at 14:08
    
It's all valid i was merely showing the structure in the simplest of terms.... –  André Figueira Jan 18 '13 at 14:09
    
What i put above is just a representation of the json object structure.. –  André Figueira Jan 18 '13 at 14:10
    
@AndréFigueira it would help everyone out if you would post valid JSON the first time. What you think is an accurate representation may not be the case for many others. –  Explosion Pills Jan 18 '13 at 14:19

10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assume you have this:

var items  = [{ id: 84 }, { id: 92 }, { id: 123 }, { id: 2353 }];

var filtered = items.filter(function(item) { 
   return item.id !== 123;  
});

//filtered => [{ id: 84 }, { id: 92 }, { id: 2353 }]
share|improve this answer
    
stackoverflow.com/a/14400837/454533 -- just a bit faster. –  Explosion Pills Jan 18 '13 at 14:32

Supposing you actually have an object from a json in the json variable

for (key in json) {
    if (json.hasOwnProperty(key) && json[key] == 123) {
        delete json[key];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This should be filtered by hasOwnProperty. Also, a key would be unique so there could only ever be one occurrence (=> why loop?). –  Paul S. Jan 18 '13 at 14:25
    
You are right for hasOwnProperty, i fix this. And the loop is because we want to delete a key from its value, and not the key. –  Magus Jan 18 '13 at 14:29
function removeClass(obj, cls) {
  var classes = obj.className.split(' ');

  for(i=0; i<classes.length; i++) {
    if (classes[i] == cls) {
      classes.splice(i, 1);
      i--; // (*)
    }
  }
  obj.className = classes.join(' ');

}

var obj = { className: 'open menu menu' }

removeClass(obj, 'menu')
alert(obj.className)
share|improve this answer

You can use splice function, like this:

var data = [{id:84}, {id:92}, {id:123}, {id:2353}];
            function remove(){
                for(var i = 0, max = data.length; i < max; i++) {
                    var a = data[i];

                    if(a.id === 123) {
                        data.splice(i, 1);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            remove();
share|improve this answer

Seems like you want to avoid a loop. Assuming it's available, you can use .filter:

[{id:84},{id:92},{id:123},{id:2353}]
   .filter(function (elem) { return elem.id !== 123; });

This technically does do a loop, but at least you don't have to look at it.

share|improve this answer

Assuming I'm understanding your question and comments correctly you can do something like this:

var old_array = [{id: 84},...];
var new_array = [];

for(var i = 0, len = old_array.length; i++) {
   if (old_array[i].id != 123) new_array.push(old_array[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
is there not a way to do it without looping? would rather avoid that. –  André Figueira Jan 18 '13 at 14:12
    
Why? You have to loop at some point (or recurse). –  Lloyd Jan 18 '13 at 14:13
    
well since its essentially an object there is usually a functionality like delete key or something... looping isn't a very elegant solution for removing one portion of an object. –  André Figueira Jan 18 '13 at 14:15
    
So you want to delete the property and not the object? If so look at Magus's answer. –  Lloyd Jan 18 '13 at 14:16

Shorter alternative would be:

var newArr = [{id:84}, {id:92}, {id:123}, {id:2353}].filter(function(a) {
   return a.id != 123;
});

If you have this:

var arr = [{id:84}, {id:92}, {id:123}, {id:2353}]

To remove the item with value 123, you can do:

for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    if(arr[i].id == 123) {
        arr.splice(i, 1);
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming your "json" is really an array, like [84, 92, 123, 2353]:

var myString = "[84, 92, 123, 2353]";
var myArray = JSON.parse(myString);
var index = myArray.indexOf(123); // whatever value you are looking for
myArray.splice(index, 1);

http://jsfiddle.net/7vkK6/

share|improve this answer

What you have currently is not JSON so I'll give you some different options.

If you have an Array arr = [84,92,123,2353] then

arr = arr.filter(function (x) {return x !== 123;}); // all occurrences
// OR
arr.splice(arr.indexOf(123), 1); // first occurrence only

If you have an Object obj = {"84": a, "92": b, "123": c, "2353": d}, a to d some expressions, then

delete obj['123']; // obj now {"84": a, "92": b, "2353": d}
share|improve this answer

1) JSON is a string, not an array or an object.

var json = "[1,2,3]";

2) Valid JSON NEEDS to be valid JS

var myJSObj = { 1,2,3 }, // broken
    myJSArr = [ name : 1, name2 : 2 ]; // broken

3) If you have a JS Array, you can remove an element by using [].splice

var arr = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ],
    i = 0, l = arr.length,
    test = 4;

for (; i < l; i += 1) {
    if (arr[i] === test) { arr.splice(i, 1); } // remove 1 starting at i
}

4) If you have an object with named keys, you can use delete

var obj = { val : 1 };
delete obj.val;
share|improve this answer
    
JSON's not even a string, it's a notation like XML –  Explosion Pills Jan 18 '13 at 14:23
    
Yes, okay, but in JS, as a language, there are two ways of dealing with it: as a serialized text-string representation of the markup-lite markup, and with a JSON MIME-type in supporting browsers. –  Norguard Jan 18 '13 at 14:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.