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Is there an easy way to bit-reflect a byte variable in Delphi so that the most significant bit (MSB) gets the least significant bit (LSB) and vice versa?

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3  
Lookup table with 16 elements, and flip each nibble (4 bit pair) then combine the nibbles in reverse order. –  Warren P Jan 18 '13 at 14:21
    
@Warren or 256-bytes table and then single XLAT assembler command :-) –  Arioch 'The Jan 18 '13 at 14:28
    
Do you really mean just the high and low bits? Or do you mean to flip all the bits in the byte? –  mj2008 Jan 18 '13 at 15:00
3  
XLAT is slow.. so slow it is not available any more in x64 opcodes, as far as I remember. On old 8086/80286, XLAT did make sense. But nowadays you have indexed lookup in standard mov opcode, which is faster on modern CPUs. Such a lookup can be coded even in pascal, using an array: if the element size is 1/4/8/16, it will use a dedicated opcode prefix. Asm is not mandatory to write fast code. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 18 '13 at 15:27
2  
@Warren Doing this for nibbles is silly, as a table for bytes is much faster and simpler and will not use much memory. (I don't think Delphi is used for very small microcontrollers.) –  starblue Jan 19 '13 at 10:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted
function ByteReverseLoop(b: byte): byte;
var i: integer;
begin
  Result := 0; // actually not needed, just to make compiler happy

  for i := 1 to 8 do
  begin
    Result := Result shl 1; 
    if Odd(b) then Result := Result or 1;
    b := b shr 1;
  end;
end;

If speed is important, then you can use lookup table. You feel it once on program start and then you just take a value from table. Since you're only needing to map byte to byte, that would take 256x1=256 bytes of memory. And given recent Delphi versions support inline functions, that would provide for both speed, readability and reliability (incapsulating array lookup in the function you may be sure you would not change the values due to some typo)

Var ByteReverseLUT: array[byte] of byte;

function ByteReverse(b: byte): byte; inline;
begin Result := ByteReverseLUT[b] end;

{Unit/program initialization}
var b: byte;
    for b := Low(ByteReverseLUT) to High(ByteReverseLUT) 
        do ByteReverseLUT[b] := ByteReverseLoop(b);

Speed comparison of several implementations that were mentioned on this forum.
AMD Phenom2 x710 / Win7 x64 / Delphi XE2 32-bit {$O+}

Pascal AND original:       12494
Pascal AND reversed:       33459
Pascal IF original:        46829
Pascal IF reversed:        45585

       Asm SHIFT 1:        15802
       Asm SHIFT 2:        15490
       Asm SHIFT 3:        16212

         Asm AND 1:        19408
         Asm AND 2:        19601
         Asm AND 3:        19802

Pascal AND unrolled: 10052 Asm Shift unrolled: 4573 LUT, called: 3192 Pascal math, called: 4614

http://pastebin.ca/2304708

Note: LUT (lookup table) timings are probably rather optimistic here. Due to running in tight loop the whole table was sucked into L1 CPU cache. In real computations this function most probably would be called much less frequently and L1 cache would not keep the table entirely.


Pascal inlined function calls result are bogus - Delphi did not called them, detecting they had no side-effects. But funny - the timings were different.

      Asm Shift unrolled:         4040
             LUT, called:         3011
            LUT, inlined:          977
         Pascal unrolled:        10052
  Pas. unrolled, inlined:          849
     Pascal math, called:         4614
    Pascal math, inlined:         6517

And below the explanation:

Project1.dpr.427: d := BitFlipLUT(i)
0044AC45 8BC3             mov eax,ebx
0044AC47 E89CCAFFFF       call BitFlipLUT

Project1.dpr.435: d := BitFlipLUTi(i)

Project1.dpr.444: d := MirrorByte(i);
0044ACF8 8BC3             mov eax,ebx
0044ACFA E881C8FFFF       call MirrorByte

Project1.dpr.453: d := MirrorByteI(i);
0044AD55 8BC3             mov eax,ebx

Project1.dpr.460: d := MirrorByte7Op(i);
0044ADA3 8BC3             mov eax,ebx
0044ADA5 E8AEC7FFFF       call MirrorByte7Op

Project1.dpr.462: d := MirrorByte7OpI(i);
0044ADF1 0FB6C3           movzx eax,bl

All calls to inlined functions were eliminated. Yet about passing the parameters Delphi made three different decisions:

  1. For the 1st call it eliminated parameter passing together with function call
  2. For the 2nd call it kept parameter passing, despite function was not called
  3. For the 3rd call it kept changed parameter passing, which proved longer then function call itself! Weird! :-)
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1  
Assembler just sets you maintenence work for future targets and the performance is still poor when compared to lookup. Perhaps you should advise not to use asm. –  David Heffernan Jan 18 '13 at 14:50
    
@David, i'd say not to use ASM as the only implementation. –  Arioch 'The Jan 18 '13 at 16:17
    
It should not be called BitFlip. Flipping is changing 0 to 1 and 1 to 0. But this changes position. Reflection is quite a reasonable name. Also, the x86 asm is wrong. It throws AVs. When you fix the x86 asm version you find that it's 2.5 times slower than the Pascal in my answer. For x64 the ratio is 1.8. –  David Heffernan Jan 18 '13 at 17:09
1  
And the lookup table is more than 10 times faster than any 1 to 8 bit at a time variant –  David Heffernan Jan 18 '13 at 17:15
1  
The pitfall was to copy "Result := 0" redundant line to the assembler. It made the function twice as slow... And u managed to hit the optimization sweet spot, lucky you. you measured as u saw my code, if i would not put it - i doubt u would devise ur own asm implementation to measure it. –  Arioch 'The Jan 20 '13 at 9:48

In code you can do it like this:

function ReverseBits(b: Byte): Byte;
var 
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := 0;
  for i := 1 to 8 do
  begin
    Result := (Result shl 1) or (b and 1);
    b := b shr 1;
  end;
end;

But a lookup table would be much more efficient, and only consume 256 bytes of memory.

function ReverseBits(b: Byte): Byte; inline;
const
  Table: array [Byte] of Byte = (
    0,128,64,192,32,160,96,224,16,144,80,208,48,176,112,240,
    8,136,72,200,40,168,104,232,24,152,88,216,56,184,120,248,
    4,132,68,196,36,164,100,228,20,148,84,212,52,180,116,244,
    12,140,76,204,44,172,108,236,28,156,92,220,60,188,124,252,
    2,130,66,194,34,162,98,226,18,146,82,210,50,178,114,242,
    10,138,74,202,42,170,106,234,26,154,90,218,58,186,122,250,
    6,134,70,198,38,166,102,230,22,150,86,214,54,182,118,246,
    14,142,78,206,46,174,110,238,30,158,94,222,62,190,126,254,
    1,129,65,193,33,161,97,225,17,145,81,209,49,177,113,241,
    9,137,73,201,41,169,105,233,25,153,89,217,57,185,121,249,
    5,133,69,197,37,165,101,229,21,149,85,213,53,181,117,245,
    13,141,77,205,45,173,109,237,29,157,93,221,61,189,125,253,
    3,131,67,195,35,163,99,227,19,147,83,211,51,179,115,243,
    11,139,75,203,43,171,107,235,27,155,91,219,59,187,123,251,
    7,135,71,199,39,167,103,231,23,151,87,215,55,183,119,247,
    15,143,79,207,47,175,111,239,31,159,95,223,63,191,127,255
  );
begin
  Result := Table[b];
end;

This is more than 10 times faster than the version of the code that operates on individual bits.


Finally, I don't normally like to comment too negatively on accepted answers when I have a competing answer. In this case there are very serious problems with the answer that you accepted that I would like to state clearly for you and also for any future readers.

You accepted @Arioch's answer at the time when it contained the same Pascal code as can be seen in this answer, together with two assembler versions. It turns out that those assembler versions are much slower than the Pascal version. They are twice as slow as the Pascal code.

It is a common fallacy that converting high level code to assembler results in faster code. If you do it badly then you can easily produce code that runs more slowly than the code emitted by the compiler. There are times when it is worth writing code in assembler but you must not ever do so without proper benchmarking.

What is particularly egregious about the use of assembler here is that it is so obvious that the table based solution will be exceedingly fast. It's hard to imagine how that could be significantly improved upon.

share|improve this answer
    
Good interview question fodder. –  Warren P Jan 18 '13 at 14:34
    
Still, lookup table would require your function for populaton :-) –  Arioch 'The Jan 18 '13 at 14:42
    
+1 this is a very good option if those 256 bytes of memory can be traded for speed, I now I would (: –  ComputerSaysNo Jan 18 '13 at 18:34
    
The LUT version is indeed a lot faster and would be my choice too. +1 –  Rudy Velthuis Jan 19 '13 at 1:16
    
Remove loop, repeat RCR RCL 8 times to get linear code without branches and you will beat pascal code, probably you can also win replacing bytes (AL, DL) by full native 32-bit registers (EAX, EDX). Assembler is fun. Sure you can't beat LUT version. –  user246408 Jan 19 '13 at 10:19
function BitFlip(B: Byte): Byte;
const
  N: array[0..15] of Byte = (0, 8, 4, 12, 2, 10, 6, 14, 1, 9, 5, 13, 3, 11, 7, 15);
begin
  Result := N[B div 16] or N[B mod 16] shl 4;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
That is like Warren said. Modelled after IntToHex :-) But actually i cannot see the point in this. For speed-limiting massive use one should use 256-bytes lookup table and for occasional relaxed use no table is needed at all. This computation+lookup approach looks fitting neither of usecases. –  Arioch 'The Jan 18 '13 at 16:23
6  
@Arioch'The My only point here was: it's Friday afternoon. :-) Cheers. –  TOndrej Jan 18 '13 at 16:31

Using brute force can be simple and effective.

This routine is NOT on par with David's LUT solution.

Update

Added array of byte as input and result assigned to array of byte as well. This shows better performance for the LUT solution.

function MirrorByte(b : Byte) : Byte;  inline;
begin
  Result :=
    ((b and $01) shl 7) or
    ((b and $02) shl 5) or
    ((b and $04) shl 3) or
    ((b and $08) shl 1) or
    ((b and $10) shr 1) or
    ((b and $20) shr 3) or
    ((b and $40) shr 5) or
    ((b and $80) shr 7);
end;

Update 2

Googling a little, found BitReverseObvious.

function MirrorByte7Op(b : Byte) : Byte;  inline;
begin
  Result :=
    {$IFDEF WIN64}  // This is slightly better in x64 than the code in x32
    (((b * UInt64($80200802)) and UInt64($0884422110)) * UInt64($0101010101)) shr 32;
    {$ENDIF}
    {$IFDEF WIN32}
    ((b * $0802 and $22110) or (b * $8020 and $88440)) * $10101 shr 16;
    {$ENDIF}
end;

This one is closer to the LUT solution, even faster in one test.

To sum up, MirrorByte7Op() is 5-30% slower than LUT in 3 of the tests, 5% faster in one test.

Code to benchmark:

uses
  System.Diagnostics;

const 
  cBit : Byte = $AA;
  cLoopMax = 1000000000;
var
  sw : TStopWatch;
  arrB : array of byte;
  i : Integer;

begin
  SetLength(arrB,cLoopMax);
  for i := 0 TO Length(arrB) - 1 do
    arrB[i]:= System.Random(256);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    b := b;
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('Loop             ',b:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    b := ReflectBits(arrB[i]); 
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('RB array in:     ',b:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    b := MirrorByte(arrB[i]);
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('MB array in:     ',b:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    b := MirrorByte7Op(arrB[i]);
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('MB7Op array in : ',arrB[0]:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    arrB[i] := ReflectBits(arrB[i]);
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('RB array in/out: ',arrB[0]:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    arrB[i]:= MirrorByte(arrB[i]);
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('MB array in/out: ',arrB[0]:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  sw := TStopWatch.StartNew;
  for i := 0 to Pred(cLoopMax) do
  begin
    arrB[i]:= MirrorByte7Op(arrB[i]);
  end;
  sw.Stop;
  WriteLn('MB7Op array in/out: ',arrB[0]:3,' ',sw.ElapsedMilliSeconds);

  ReadLn;

end.

Result of benchmark (XE3, i7 CPU 870):

                                32 bit     64 bit
--------------------------------------------------
Byte assignment (= empty loop)   599 ms    2117 ms
MirrorByte    to byte, array in 6991 ms    8746 ms
MirrorByte7Op to byte, array in 1384 ms    2510 ms
ReverseBits   to byte, array in  945 ms    2119 ms
--------------------------------------------------
ReverseBits   array in/out      1944 ms    3721 ms
MirrorByte7Op array in/out      1790 ms    3856 ms
BitFlipNibble array in/out      1995 ms    6730 ms
MirrorByte    array in/out      7157 ms    8894 ms
ByteReverse   array in/out     38246 ms   42303 ms

I added some of the other proposals in the last part of the table (all inlined). It is probably most fair to test in a loop with an array in and an array as result. ReverseBits (LUT) and MirrorByte7Op are comparable in speed followed by BitFlipNibble (LUT) which underperforms a bit in x64.

Note: I added a new algorithm for the x64 bit part of MirrorByte7Op. It makes better use of the 64 bit registers and has fewer instructions.

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2  
In my benchmark program, this code is 7 times slower than LUT on x86 and 3 times slower than LUT on x64. Not sure why LUT is so much slower on x64 than x86. My benchmark reverses bits on a 1GB array of bytes. The possible byte patterns are uniformly distributed within the array. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '13 at 16:20
1  
Included my simple benchmark. Both routines are independent of byte patterns. I will try with an array of bytes. –  LU RD Jan 19 '13 at 16:24
    
Look under the debugger and you should see that your benchmark does nothing. Because you never read the value returned from b, the compiler simply optimises it away! You are just timing an empty for loop. Sorry to burst your bubble. By the way, I like your code. It's rather nicely done in my view. It's faster than the Pascal version in my answer. LUT is still king though. I defy anyone to beat that! –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '13 at 16:34
1  
I wonder if you are planning to fix the benchmark in this answer. I don't like the misleading nature of this answer. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '13 at 18:31
2  
Good for the compiler!! Benchmarking can be really tricky. Always worth stepping through in CPU window to see what code actually runs! Thanks for the update. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '13 at 20:58

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