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There are lots of similar questions, however I wasn't able to find an answer to this.

Imagine you have a HTML page like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>Page title</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="content">
            <table>
                <tr>
                    <td>A</td>
                    <td>B</td>
                    <td>C</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                    <td>D</td>
                    <td>E</td>
                    <td>F</td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

and you want to select the second <td> element on the page that is a first child of its parent. In this case, it's the element <td>D</td>.

Note that this wording should be kept intact, for example it's not the same as selecting the second <tr> and then its first child (results in the same element), because the original page I'm working with is far more complex than this minimal testcase and this approach wouldn't work there.

What I have done so far:

A CSS selector #content td:first-child finds me A and D, now I am able to select the second element either via JS (document.querySelectorAll("query")[1]) or in Java (where I'm working with those elements in the end). However, it's quite inconsistent to use additional code for what could be done via a selector.

Similarly, I can use an XPath expression: id('content')//td[1]. It's the equivalent to the CSS selector above. It returns a node-set, so I thought that id('content')//td[1][2] will work the way I wanted, but no luck.

After some time, I discovered ( id('content')//td[1] )[2] to be working the way I want so I went for that and am quite happy with it.


Still, it's a letdown for me to see that I couldn't do a single query to get my element, and therefore an academic question is in place: Is there any other solution, either with a CSS selector, or an XPath expression to do my query? What did I miss? Can it be done?

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Isn't ( id('content')//td[1] )[2] a single query? I'd say this is the right way to do it, though you could leave off the id() part and just use (//td[1])[2] if you really want to include the whole document. –  JLRishe Jan 18 '13 at 14:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

CSS selectors currently don't provide any way to select the nth element in a set of globally-matched elements or the nth occurrence of some element in the entire DOM. The structural :nth-*() functional pseudo-classes that are provided by both Selectors 3 and Selectors 4 all count by the nth child of its parent matching the criteria, rather than by the nth element in the entire DOM.

The current Selectors syntax doesn't provide an intuitive way to say "this is the nth of a set of matched elements in the DOM"; even :nth-match() and :nth-last-match() in Selectors 4 have a pretty awkward syntax as they currently stand. So that is indeed a letdown.

As for XPath, the expression to use is (id('content')//td[1])[2], as you have already found. The outer () simply means "this entire subexpression should be evaluated before the [2] predicate" or "the [2] predicate should operate on the result of this entire subexpression, not just //td[1]." Without them, the expression td[1][2] would be treated collectively, with two conflicting predicates that would never work together (you can't have the same element be both first and second!).

Having parentheses around a subexpression doesn't make it an extra query per se; if it were, then you could consider each of id('content'), //td, [1] and [2] a "query" as well in its own right, with implied (or optional) parentheses. And that's a lot of queries :)

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I guess I just hoped I had missed something. Thank you for the additional explanation! –  Slanec Jan 18 '13 at 22:50

Use this simple XPath expression:

(//td[1])[2]

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy-of select="(//td[1])[2]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>Page title</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="content">
            <table>
                <tr>
                    <td>A</td>
                    <td>B</td>
                    <td>C</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                    <td>D</td>
                    <td>E</td>
                    <td>F</td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

the XPath expression is evaluated and the result of this evaluation is copied to the output:

<td>D</td>
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