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I'm using existing code which isn't well formatted. The Eclipse Formatter fails at formatting and I'm new to configuring the formatter. Therefore, after a while of trying, I failed. Build-in templates didn't work. Anyway, I'd like to use the Eclipse Formatter, not a plug in.

I'd like to get the following code...

/** Class A
  */
public class A
{  
    /** An int */
    int i;

    /** An A */
    A(int i)
    {  this.i = i;
    }

    /** Gets i */
    int getI()
    {   int b = i *2;
        if(check())
        {   try { doIt(); } catch (Exception e) {doIt();}
            if (check())
            {   if (check()) doIt();
                else return i;
            }
        }
        return b;
    }

    private void doIt() {}

    private boolean check() {return false;}
}

...formatted into...

/** 
 * Class A
 */
public class A {  

    /** 
     * An int 
     */
    int i;

    /** 
     * An A 
     */
    A(int i){  
        this.i = i;
    }

    /** 
     * Gets i 
     */
    int getI(){ 
        int b = i *2;
        if(check()){    
            try { 
                doIt(); 
            } catch (Exception e) {
                doIt();
            }
            if (check()){
                if (check()){
                    doIt();
                }else{
                    return i;
                }
            }
        }
        return b;
   }

    private void doIt() {}

    private boolean check() {return false;}

}

Is there a way to configure the Formatter to handle my problem?

Any help is highly appreciated since it's a lot of code :-)

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closed as too localized by Andreas_D, A--C, 0x499602D2, The Shift Exchange, Alexis King Jan 19 '13 at 4:09

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2  
How does the formatter 'fail' at formatting? If you get an error, you should add it to your question. –  sharakan Jan 18 '13 at 14:46
    
-1 for not actually specifying what goes wrong –  Mark Rotteveel Jan 18 '13 at 15:36
    
Well I didn't specify an error because there is none. The code wasn't formatted as desired, that's it. Anyway, a correct answer has been posted yet. –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 18:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Clean Up (Source -> Clean Up...) instead of the formatter. Clean Up has an option to use blocks for if, while, do and for statements as well as formatting options, so you can get formatting very close to what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes it worse. But nice to know anyway. Thanks! –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 15:05
    
@my_greets: How exactly does it make worse? You can configure pretty much everything there. Have a look at the link I've given. –  vitaut Jan 18 '13 at 15:06
    
Thanks a lot. I tried it again after formatting as Harsha advised to. Works as desired now. –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 15:22

First of all, your code is not compilable. You will first need to fix the compile errors and after that Eclipse will no longer fail to format the code the way you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for that. Should be compilable right now. –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 14:54

In Window / Preferences: check Java / Code Style / Formatter. Then "Edit" the active profile.

Then look for the "Braces" tab. There you can configure the method, constructor, etc... declarations to be "on the same line" for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried that, didn't work –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 14:56
    
It should work only if the code can be compiled by Eclipse. –  tibkov Jan 18 '13 at 15:01

Java (Sun) codestyle has braces on the right, not on the new line. I suggest you to get habit to this code style. Beside many programmers like braces on the new line, most of Java code uses java standard conventions.

Many programmers don't fully respect those guidelines (I am one of the few that doesn't like to go after colum 80), so those conventions have to be adapted to your feel. But the general direction is that Java code uses to open curly braces on the same line (differently than C, for instance).

It's a good idea to keep the general style, also helps you in reading other people's code.

BTW, Eclipse formatter is fully customizable, and you can have a the braces on the new line if you feel so:

enter image description here

This looks C code to me :).

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Well, I tried that but failed. That's why I'm asking :-) –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 14:59

I think Ctrl + Shift + F in Eclipse can do this

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it does, thanks. But is there a way to add curly brackets? –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 14:55
    
Arrgh... I used Ctrl + Shift + I until now :-/ –  my_greets Jan 18 '13 at 15:01
    
@my_greets: Use Clean Up to add curly brackets. See my answer. –  vitaut Jan 18 '13 at 15:03

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