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I want to write a back-ground job (EJB 3.1), which executes every minute. For this I use the following annotation:

@Schedule(minute = "*/1", hour = "*")

which is working fine.

However, sometimes the job may take more than one minute. In this case, the timer is still fired, causing threading-issues.

Is it somehow possible, to terminate the scheduler if the current execution is not completed?

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What application server were you using at the time you experienced this behaviour? I'm using Glassfish 3.1.2.2 and the timer does not work like you describe. –  kovica Mar 30 '13 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If only 1 timer may ever be active at the same time, there are a couple of solutions.

First of all the @Timer should probably be present on an @Singleton. In a Singleton methods are by default write-locked, so the container will automatically be locked-out when trying to invoke the timer method while there's still activity in it.

The following is basically enough:

@Singleton
public class TimerBean {

    @Schedule(second= "*/5", minute = "*", hour = "*", persistent = false)
    public void atSchedule() throws InterruptedException {

        System.out.println("Called");
        Thread.sleep(10000);
    }
}

atSchedule is write-locked by default and there can only ever be one thread active in it, including calls initiated by the container.

Upon being locked-out, the container may retry the timer though, so to prevent this you'd use a read lock instead and delegate to a second bean (the second bean is needed because EJB 3.1 does not allow upgrading a read lock to a write lock).

The timer bean:

@Singleton
public class TimerBean {

    @EJB
    private WorkerBean workerBean;

    @Lock(READ)
    @Schedule(second = "*/5", minute = "*", hour = "*", persistent = false)
    public void atSchedule() {

        try {
            workerBean.doTimerWork();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("Timer still bussy");
        }
    }

}

The worker bean:

@Singleton
public class WorkerBean {

    @AccessTimeout(0)
    public void doTimerWork() throws InterruptedException {
        System.out.println("Timer work started");
        Thread.sleep(12000);
        System.out.println("Timer work done");
    }
}

This will likely still print a noisy exception in the log, so a more verbose but more silently solution is to use an explicit boolean:

The timer bean:

@Singleton
public class TimerBean {

    @EJB
    private WorkerBean workerBean;

    @Lock(READ)
    @Schedule(second = "*/5", minute = "*", hour = "*", persistent = false)
    public void atSchedule() {
        workerBean.doTimerWork();
    }

}

The worker bean:

@Singleton
public class WorkerBean {

    private AtomicBoolean busy = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    @Lock(READ)
    public void doTimerWork() throws InterruptedException {

        if (!busy.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
            return;
        }

        try {
            System.out.println("Timer work started");
            Thread.sleep(12000);
            System.out.println("Timer work done");
        } finally {
            busy.set(false);
        }
    }

}

There are some more variations possible, e.g. you could delegate the busy check to an interceptor, or inject a singleton that only contains the boolean into the timer bean, and check that boolean there, etc.

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1  
no second EJB is needed for your second solution using the AtomicBoolean. The check could also be made within the TimerBean. –  Nick Russler Jan 20 '14 at 21:32

I ran into the same problem but solved it slightly differently.

@Singleton
public class DoStuffTask {

    @Resource
    private TimerService timerSvc;

    @Timeout
    public void doStuff(Timer t) {
        try {
            doActualStuff(t);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            LOG.warn("Error running task", e);
        }
        scheduleStuff();
    }

    private void doActualStuff(Timer t) {

        LOG.info("Doing Stuff " + t.getInfo());
    }

    @PostConstruct
    public void initialise() {
        scheduleStuff();
    }

    private void scheduleStuff() {
        timerSvc.createSingleActionTimer(1000l, new TimerConfig());
    }

    public void stop() {
        for(Timer timer : timerSvc.getTimers()) {
            timer.cancel();
        }
    }

}

This works by setting up a task to execute in the future (in this case, in one second). At the end of the task, it schedules the task again.

EDIT: Updated to refactor the "stuff" into another method so that we can guard for exceptions so that the rescheduling of the timer always happens

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hi, I am also inside the same issue..I tried the first approach but did not solve the issue. can you please provide more information/ example on this and also for the exceptional situation you mentioned in 'doStuff'..? –  Nomesh DeSilva Nov 13 '14 at 5:29
    
@NomeshDeSilva, I've updated the code to allow for exceptions –  drone.ah Nov 28 '14 at 10:12
    
Thanks drone.ah ! –  Nomesh DeSilva Nov 29 '14 at 4:18

well I had a similar problem. There was a job that was supposed to run every 30 minutes and sometimes the job was taking more than 30 minutes to complete in this case another instance of job was starting while previous one was not yet finished. I solved it by having a static boolean variable which my job would set to true whenever it started run and then set it back to false whenever it finished. Since its a static variable all instances will see the same copy at all times. You could even synchronize the block when u set and unset the static variable. class myjob{ private static boolean isRunning=false;

public executeJob(){
if (isRunning)
    return;
isRunning=true;
//execute job
isRunning=false;
  }

}
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