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I used this constructor to initialize this object

 ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();

It turned out that allTabs was null after initialization. I couldn't add MyHomeworkModel objects to it because of that.

Please help me and thanks in advance.

using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using MyHomework;

namespace MyHomework__MVVM_
{
    class MyHomeworkViewModel
    {
        private ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs;
        private MyHomeworkModel selectedTab;

        public MyHomeworkViewModel()
        {
            ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();
            selectedTab = new MyHomeworkModel();
            AddCourseCommand = new AddCourseCommand(this);
        }

        public ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> AllTabs
        {
            get
            {
                return allTabs;
            }
            set
            {
                allTabs = value;
            }
        }

        public MyHomeworkModel SelectedTab
        {
            get
            {
                return selectedTab;
            }
            set
            {
                selectedTab = value;
            }
        }

        public ICommand AddCourseCommand
        {
            get;
            private set;
        }

        public void AddNewTab()
        {
            NewCourseName ncn = new NewCourseName();
            ncn.ShowDialog();
            if (ncn.courseName != null)
            {
                MyHomeworkModel newTab = new MyHomeworkModel();
                newTab.Header = ncn.courseName;
                AllTabs.Add(newTab);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
are you sure that you look on the same objects. Cound be that there are more then one allTabs objects in your application ? – Tigran Jan 18 '13 at 15:31
    
Try to Create a Property to this Variable and that set a breakpoint into the Setter, than look where it runs into after setting to Null – Venson Jan 18 '13 at 15:31
    
I think you're missing something where allTabs is changed. Following that code in isolation, allTabs will not be null. – Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '13 at 15:31
    
Is your executed code being executed??? – Big Daddy Jan 18 '13 at 15:33
    
A quick debug session should have spotted this immediately, i.e. you should have looked at the value after it is initialized in your constructor and afterwords, you would have seen two separate objects named allTabs. – NominSim Jan 18 '13 at 15:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted
 public MyHomeworkViewModel()
    {
        allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();
        selectedTab = new MyHomeworkModel();
        AddCourseCommand = new AddCourseCommand(this);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What a dumb mistake! I can't believe that XD Thank you! – user1447343 Jan 18 '13 at 15:38

Here(in the constructor of MyHomeworkViewModel):

ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();

You create a local variable that shadows the class member and thus it remains null after the constructor call. To avoid that simply skip the type at the beginning of the statement:

allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();
share|improve this answer
    
This should be the accepted answer because of the explenation – Robbie Vercammen May 22 at 12:28

If you create

ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();

In your Constructor, it will be removed after run out of it. Declare it outside and that call just

allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();
share|improve this answer
    
He is declaring it outside of the constructor, he's just shadowing it in the constructor with a local. – Servy Jan 18 '13 at 15:34
    
Yes thats right, but he Never create an Instance of the Membervariable and thats the point! – Venson Jan 18 '13 at 15:39
    
You state that he should declare it outside of the constructor, but he's already doing that, that's my point. He needs to initialize the field that he has already declared, and your first 3 edits didn't state that. – Servy Jan 18 '13 at 15:40

The line ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>(); is not setting the allTabs field to a new collection, it's creating a new local variable and setting that local variable to a new collection. To initialize the field you should change that line to:

allTabs = new ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel>();
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd advise using this.allTabs so it's clear which scope the variable is in. – Ash Burlaczenko Jan 18 '13 at 15:37
    
@AshBurlaczenko Well, here he shouldn't have any locals, since none are needed, so there shouldn't be anything to confuse it with. The idea of using this. for all field access is a convention that some like, and some don't. – Servy Jan 18 '13 at 15:39

This is one reason for the C# convention of prefixing private class variables with an underscore:

private ObservableCollection<MyHomeworkModel> _allTabs;

More guidelines here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/vstudio/ms229042%28v=vs.100%29.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
1) doing that wouldn't prevent him from shadowing it if he still uses the type in the constructor 2) it's not nearly as common of a convention in C# as in VB. VB uses it more since it can't rely on case sensitivity. 3) your link doesn't encourage that practice. – Servy Jan 18 '13 at 16:02

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