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I have read many topics how to handle Javascript's onclick vs Jquery;s .click(), but I can't figure out how to pass parameters using jQuery.

1st option - Javascript, HTML

The HTML

<input type="button" onclick="doAction(<?=$id?>,'order');" />

Therefore in JS I can do

function doAction(id,type){

 //do something here

}

2nd option - jQuery,HTML

The HTML

<input type="button" id="trigger" />

So jQuery becomes

$("#trigger").click(function() {

   //do something here

 });

Do I have to do something like (in this case how do I know the values of id and type?)

  $("#trigger").click({id: "???", type: "????"}, other_function);

  function other_function(event){
     id = event.data.param1;
     type = event.data.param2;
   }

Do I have to "pass parameters" by using

  HTML
  <input type="hidden" id="id" value="<?=$id?>" />
  <input type="hidden" id="type" value="order" />

  jQuery

   $("#trigger").click(function(){
      var id = $("#id").val();
      var type = $("#type").val();
      //do something

   });

I want to avoid using onclick() as I have read that it should be avoided. I just need a suitable way to pass parameters as I did by using onclick().

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Sure, there some ways to do it. I just want to write nice and clean code. So, I'm wondering if there is another way –  user1400718 Jan 18 '13 at 15:41
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4 Answers 4

You can use data to pass the data() to event.

Live Demo

 <input type="hidden" id="id" data-idatt="123" />
 <input type="hidden" id="type" value="order" />

 $("#trigger").click(function(){
    var id = $("#id").data("idatt").val();
 });
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1  
As a side note, "idAtt" will have to be lowercase here, so data("idatt"). To get "idAtt" your data tag would be data-id-att. –  Chris Dixon Jan 18 '13 at 15:43
1  
Thanks @thedixon. –  Adil Jan 18 '13 at 15:45
    
so the hyphen-to-camelcase applies on data attributes too, I thought it only applied to CSS properties. Well, in this case it is more camelcase-to-hyphen. Learning something new everyday - here's the fiddle to see it in practice. –  Fabrício Matté Jan 18 '13 at 15:48
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You don't need to take parameter from outside and don't need hidden field either

$("#trigger").click(function(){
      var id = <?=$id?>;
      //do something
   });
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using chrome open up the console and try this

$(#trigger);
$(#trigger).click(function(e) {
  console.log(
               $(this),
               $(this).attr('type') 
             );
});

the function has a hidden variable called this and is the element you triggered the event.

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$("#myElement").click({ "a": 1, "b": 2 }, function (e) {
    alert(e.data.a); // alerts 1
    alert(e.data.b); // alerts 2
});
share|improve this answer
    
Even though this is a good solution, OP already wrote it in the question, and usually JS is in a separate file from the generated HTML which OP is populating with PHP. –  Fabrício Matté Jan 18 '13 at 15:52
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