Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a newbie in C and I am trying to implement a linked list which nodes are defined as follows:

typedef struct _cListNode
{
    void *_data;                //generic pointer to any data type
    struct _cListNode *next;    //next node in the list
} cListNode;

I need the InsertElement(cList myList, void *dataToInsert) function not to grow the list when the element that is being inserted is already in (i.e. no duplicates). My current problem is that I can't find a way to compare dataToInsert (the parameter) with _data (inside my node).

I thought of traversing the list externally before calling the InsertElement function and taking care of the comparisons outside the implementation of the list where I do know what the type is but I was hoping for a better design/solution.

share|improve this question
    
Is this the only structure of your linked list? Isn't there a parent structure which has a member of type cListNode? –  sgarizvi Jan 18 '13 at 15:51
    
Nop, this is just how my nodes are defined. The linked list definition contains a head, tail, size, as well as the pointers to the functions I will be calling on it –  wotann07 Jan 18 '13 at 15:55
    
that's what I thought. The only approach is to search the whole linked list for already existing data. Create a helper function contains or something like that. Call it in the beginning of the InsertElement function. Perform insertion if the contains function returns false. –  sgarizvi Jan 18 '13 at 16:00
    
I'm assuming the contains function will have to be defined outside the list implementation though right and will be type dependent/not generic? that's what I meant about traversing the list externally ;) @sgar91 –  wotann07 Jan 18 '13 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Given two void pointers it is not possible to compare their data. This is because you do not know the size of the types of each of the pointers. If you want to compare their data, then you would need to store the pointers and the size of their data. Then you could use memcmp to compare the memory pointed at:

 typedef struct _cListNode
 {
     void *_data;                //generic pointer to any data type
     size_t size;
     struct _cListNode *next;    //next node in the list
 } cListNode;

 int memcmp ( const void * ptr1, const void * ptr2, size_t num );

So:

 memcmp(node_data_ptr, new_data_ptr, size_of_item_pointed_at);

You should only do the memcmp if the size is the same for both pointers, otherwise they are clearly different and you don't want to end up comparing invalid memory.

Your other option is to compare the pointers themselves and see if they are pointing at the same section of memory. It depends on what you mean by "duplicate".

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry if I wasn't specific enough. By duplicate I mean the data the pointers are pointing to. In most cases they will not be pointing at the same section but it might be the case that the data they contain is the same. Also, can't the data two pointers are pointing at respectively be the same size yet differ in value/content? Thanks for your answer! –  wotann07 Jan 18 '13 at 15:57
    
They certainly can be the same! That is why I suggest using memcmp to compare the memory pointed to by the two pointers if they are the same size. I'll update my message to be more clear. –  jmh Jan 19 '13 at 4:17

You may want to do something like this. I'm supposing your linked list structure is as follows:

typedef struct _cList
{
   cListNode* head;
   cListNode* tail;
   size_t size;
} cList;

int contains(cList* list, void* data, size_t dataSize)
{
   cListNode* temp = list->head;

   while(temp)
   {
      if(!memcmp(data, temp->_data, dataSize))
         return 1;
      temp = temp->next;
   }
   return 0;
}


void InsertElement(cList* myList, void *dataToInsert, size_t dataSize)
{
   if(!contains(myList,dataToInsert, dataSize))
   {
     //Insert Data
   }
   else
   {
     //Data Is already present.
   }
}

You should create the struct cListNode as specified in @jmh's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll try this. thanks a lot! –  wotann07 Jan 18 '13 at 16:12
    
@wotann07.. is there something wrong with my answer? why did you un-accept it? –  sgarizvi Jan 18 '13 at 16:18
    
...actually your answer is very complete and thorough. I realized that when I accepted yours, the previous answer got deselected (I didn't know you could only accept one answer). the reason why I chose to gave it to is that he has way less reputation than you do (so I thought this might benefit more) and although without sample code his answer contained pretty much all the information. sorry I'm still learning the rules of the game, this actually the second question I've ever posted here. thanks again for your answer! –  wotann07 Jan 18 '13 at 23:21
    
@wotann07... its not about reputation. You should accept the answer which YOU like the most. I wasn't forcing you to accept my answer, just curious. :) –  sgarizvi Jan 19 '13 at 4:48
1  
He is right :) I won't get offended if you change your mind. –  jmh Jan 19 '13 at 7:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.