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It compiles to working code in this example, but if I put more complicated things around it the program shuts down and fails to open the dialog window. The error message is exactly:

test.cpp:10:19: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to 'LPWSTR {aka wchar_t*}' [-Wwrite-strings]

#include <windows.h>
int main() {
  OPENFILENAMEW ofn;
  ZeroMemory(&ofn, sizeof(ofn));
  ofn.lStructSize = sizeof(OPENFILENAME);
  ofn.nMaxFile = MAX_PATH;
  ofn.lpstrFile = L"file name";
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to provide a buffer for windows to fill in.

The file name used to initialize the File Name edit control. The first character of this buffer must be NULL if initialization is not necessary. When the GetOpenFileName or GetSaveFileName function returns successfully, this buffer contains the drive designator, path, file name, and extension of the selected file.

Basically, windows fills in the buffer with the path and filename of the selected file after they select a file in the open/save dialog. So basically, your code should look like this:

#include <windows.h>

int main()
{
    wchar_t fileBuffer[MAX_PATH] = {0};

    OPENFILENAMEW ofn;
    ZeroMemory(&ofn, sizeof(ofn));
    ofn.lStructSize = sizeof(OPENFILENAME);
    ofn.nMaxFile = MAX_PATH;
    ofn.lpstrFile = fileBuffer;
}

I hope this helps.

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From the documentation regarding the lpstrFile field:

When the GetOpenFileName or GetSaveFileName function returns successfully, this buffer contains the drive designator, path, file name, and extension of the selected file.

This is supposed to be a pointer to a buffer that can be written to, and it must be large enough to hold the filename that you select. Pointing it to a constant string is a mistake and will lead to undefined behavior as you have observed.

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The lpstrFile member is defined as non-const (of type LPTSTR) but a string literal is const. The description for lpstrFile states that it will be populated, written to, when used with particular WINAPI functions. Writing to a string literal is undefined behaviour.

From OPENFILENAME documentation:

The file name used to initialize the File Name edit control. The first character of this buffer must be NULL if initialization is not necessary. When the GetOpenFileName or GetSaveFileName function returns successfully, this buffer contains the drive designator, path, file name, and extension of the selected file.

To correct point the lpStrFile to an array of wchar_t:

wchar_t file[100] = L"file name";

ofn.plstrFile = file;
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Non-const pointers to string literals are deprecated, because writing to a string literal causes undefined behavior:

const char* s = "abc"; // correct
char* s = "abc"; // deprecated

The same applies to wchar_t strings.

The ofn.lpstrFile pointer is non-const and is meant to point to a writable buffer. You need to provide a writable buffer and set the ofn.plstrFile pointer to that buffer.

wchar_t buf[1024];
ofn.plstrFile = buf;

See the OPENFILENAME documentation for more information.

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