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we've reached a point where we have no clue how to continue:

SHORT: We have a generic interface and a collection of the generic interface. Trying to add an implementation of the generic interface to the collection fails. What happens is that I get a compile time exception saying:

cannot convert from TestApp.IState<T>' to TestApp.IState<TestApp.IView>'

LONG [Code example]:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var coll = new StateCollection();
        var state = new SomeState();
        coll.AddState(state);
    }
}

public class StateCollection
{
    private List<StateBase<IView>> _states = new List<StateBase<IView>>();

    public void AddState<T>(StateBase<T> state) where T: IView
    {
        _states.Add(state);
    }
}

public class SomeState : StateBase<SomeView>
{

    public IView View
    {
        get;
    }
}

public class SomeView : IView
{
}

public abstract class StateBase<T> where T : IView
{
    private SomeView _view;
    public SomeView View
    {
        get { return _view; }
    }
}

public interface IView
{
}

Why does this happen? In the AddState we mention that T has to be an instance of IState. Could someone help us out with why this happens and how to do what we want to do?

EDIT1: We also tried:

    public void AddState(IState<IView> state)
    {
        _states.Add(state);
    }

But that just moves the compile time error to 'coll.AddState(state)' So the same thing happens in another place.

EDIT2: PROBLEM! I didn't give the right example. Out IState is not an interface but an abstract class. Very sorry for that! Changed code to use abstract class

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1  
What version of C# are you using? C# < 3.0 doesn't have variance with generics. –  Oded Jan 18 '13 at 15:56
    
This is because IState<SomeView> is not IState<IView>> –  sll Jan 18 '13 at 15:57
    
_states is defined as <IState<Iview>> but your trying to add IState into that collection. –  CaptainAnon Jan 18 '13 at 15:58
    
@sll SomeView does implement IView –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 15:59
    
@Oded I'm using .NET version 4.0 –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 15:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

this looks more like a parameter error for the Add function. Have you tried declaring the add function without using the generics? The inheritance itself should allow it. Make the AddState function look like like so:

Edit (as per Edit2):

As mentioned, the inheritance itself should take care of the generics. As long as whatever class you declared properly implements IView, or IState<IView>, then there shouldn't be any issues...

public absract class StateBase
{
    public IView view { get; set; }

    ....
}

public Interface IView
{ ... }

public class StateCollection
{
    private List<StateBase> _states = new List<StateBase>();

    public void AddState(StateBase state)
    {
        _states.Add(state);
    }
}

public class SomeView : IView
{ ... }

etc etc and so on, as often as needed

public class SomeState : StateBase
{
    private SomeView my_view;

    public IView view
    {
        get { return (IView)SomeView; }
        set { ; }
    }
}

//program remains unchanged

In this case, SomeState is still an IState object, and all IState objects implement IView, and SomeView is an IView object. SomeState implements SomeView internally. Looks the same to me, but I dont know how well the adaption would work with your real code.

Any other classes would follow the same model. The State will implement StateBase, and internally declare a custom View, which itself needs to extend IView. That way the IView cast on the custom view will work.

From comment:

public class BarState : StateBase
{
    private BarView my_view;

    public IView view
    {
        get { return (IView)BarView; }
        set { ; }
    }
}

public class BarView : IView
{ ... }
share|improve this answer
    
I was editing the post at the same time you posted this issue. This also doesn't work. When I do this I just get "The best overloaded method match for 'TestApp.StateCollection.AddState(TestApp.IState<TestApp.IView>)' has some invalid arguments" when calling AddState (see EDIT1) –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:05
    
Have you tried casting SomeState? –  Nevyn Jan 18 '13 at 16:07
    
I tried state as IState<IView> but that just returns null as in, the casting fails –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:08
    
if the casting fails, then that means that the code doesn't recognize SomeState as a proper instance of IState<IView>, otherwise you would be able to cast it. This seems to be the root of the issue, inheritance isn't working as it looks like it should with Templating. –  Nevyn Jan 18 '13 at 16:11
    
Yeah that seems to be the problem, but why and how do we get around this? –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:12

How about these changes:

public class SomeState : IState<SomeView>
{
    public SomeView View
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
} 

Instead of using generic Type T use IView in AddState method

public void AddState(IState<IView> state)
{
    _states.Add(state);
}

Make T covariant in IState using out keyword

public interface IState<out T> where T : IView
{
    T View { get; }
}

SOLUTION FOR EDIT2:

Don't know if it is ok for you but you can.

public class StateCollection
{
    private List<IState<IView>> _states = new List<IState<IView>>();

    public void AddState(IState<IView> state)
    {
        _states.Add(state);
    }
}

public class SomeState : StateBase<SomeView>
{
    public override SomeView View
    {
        get { return null; }
    }
}

public abstract class StateBase<T> : IState<T> where T : IView
{
   public abstract T View { get; }
}

public interface IState<out T> where T : IView
{
    T View { get; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. I'm sorry, my mistake. See Edit2. –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:19
1  
What you are asking for is Covariance and Contravariance in Generics which is only applicaple for interfaces and delegates. The only chance is extracting your abstract class to an interface. –  Mehmet Ataş Jan 18 '13 at 16:21

First solution

public class StateCollection
    {
        private readonly List<IState<IView>> _states = new List<IState<IView>>();

        public void AddState(IState<IView> state)
        {
            _states.Add(state);
        }
    }

as suggested by Nevyn. To have it to work, mark T as covariant in interface IState<T>

public interface IState<out T> where T:IView
    {
        IView View { get; }
    }

Second solution : (keep change in class StateCollection)

change interface IState<T> to

public interface IState<out T> where T : IView
    {
        T View { get; }
    }

and class SomeState to

public class SomeState : IState<SomeView>
    {
        public SomeView View{ get;private set; }
    }

Solution for Edit2 :

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var coll = new StateCollection();
            var state = new SomeState();
            coll.AddState(state);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    public class StateCollection
    {
        private List<IStateBase<IView>> _states = new List<IStateBase<IView>>();

        public void AddState(IStateBase<IView> state)
        {
            _states.Add(state);
        }
    }

    public class SomeState : StateBase<SomeView>
    {
    }

    public class SomeView : IView
    {
    }

    public interface IStateBase<out T> where T : IView
    {
        T View { get; }
    }

    public abstract class StateBase<T> : IStateBase<T> where T : IView
    {
        public T View { get; set; }
    }

    public interface IView
    {
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. I'm sorry, my mistake. See Edit2. –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:20
    
@MrSoundless then... indeed, it won't work, as you can't use covariance outside interfaces and delegates. –  Raphaël Althaus Jan 18 '13 at 16:28
    
@MrSoundless well see "Solution for Edit2" for a solution, maybe. –  Raphaël Althaus Jan 18 '13 at 16:32

Add interface IState (non-generic) and inherit it from IState<T>. Then declare _states as List<IState> and method AddState(IState state)

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(EDIT: you just need to have your StateBase inherit from the covariant interface. You can't make a class directly covariant, you always have to go through an interface)

Try this:

public class StateCollection
{
    private List<IState<IView>> _states = new List<IState<IView>>();

    public void AddState(IState<IView> state)   
    {
        _states.Add(state);
    }
}

public class SomeState : StateBase<SomeView>
{
}

public class SomeView : IView
{
}

public interface IState<out T> where T : IView // now covariant with T
{
    T View { get; }
}

public abstract class StateBase<T> : IState<T> where T : IView
{
    public T View { get; set; }
}

public interface IView
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, please check EDIT2 –  MrSoundless Jan 18 '13 at 16:23
    
@MrSoundless see edit to answer. If you can change the definition for your abstract class (adding inheritance from a covariant interface) you can still make it work –  Paolo Falabella Jan 18 '13 at 16:35

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