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private string[] ColeccionDeCortes(string Path)
{
    DirectoryInfo X = new DirectoryInfo(Path);
    FileInfo[] listaDeArchivos = X.GetFiles();
    string[] Coleccion;

    foreach (FileInfo FI in listaDeArchivos)
    {
        //Add the FI.Name to the Coleccion[] array, 
    }

    return Coleccion;
}

I'd like to convert the FI.Name to a string and then add it to my array. How can I do this?

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up vote 193 down vote accepted

You can't add items to an array, since it has fixed length, what you're looking for is a List<string>, which can later be turned to an array using list.ToArray().

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2  
+1 I'll go ahead and offer a link to my answer on this subject. stackoverflow.com/questions/1168915/… – Sam Harwell Sep 17 '09 at 17:49

Use List<T> from System.Collections.Generic

List<string> myCollection = new List<string>();

…

myCollection.Add(aString);

If you really want an array at the end, use

myCollection.ToArray();

You might be better off abstracting to an interface, such as IEnumerable, then just returning the collection.

Edit: If you must use an array, you can preallocate it to the right size (i.e. the number of FileInfo you have). Then, in the foreach loop, maintain a counter for the array index you need to update next.

    private string[] ColeccionDeCortes(string Path)
    {
        DirectoryInfo X = new DirectoryInfo(Path);
        FileInfo[] listaDeArchivos = X.GetFiles();
        string[] Coleccion = new string[listaDeArchivos.Length];
        int i = 0;

        foreach (FileInfo FI in listaDeArchivos)
        {
            Coleccion[i++] = FI.Name;
            //Add the FI.Name to the Coleccion[] array, 
        }

        return Coleccion;
    }
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My method to join recieves only a string[] array, I can't use a List<>. Is there a way for me to solve this using an Array? – Sergio Tapia Sep 17 '09 at 17:41
    
Use a List<string> and then when you need the array, call the ToArray method – Chris Dunaway Sep 17 '09 at 18:16

Alternatively, you can resize the array.

Array.Resize(ref array, array.Length + 1);
array[array.Length - 1] = "new string";
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5  
Array.Resize is the proper way to resize an array. If you add a comment before the code snippet saying it's rarely the best way to handle situations where the array represents a resizable collection you've got a +1. :) – Sam Harwell Sep 17 '09 at 17:56
1  
Actually, this is the (only) answer that exactly solves the OP question. – dialex Nov 7 '15 at 19:48

Eazy

var myList = new List<string>();
myList.add("item1")
myList.add("item2")

var myArray = myList.ToArray();
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*Add, not add. – bigp May 17 at 19:39

If I'm not mistaken it is:

MyArray.SetValue(ArrayElement, PositionInArray)
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string[] coleccion = Directory.GetFiles(inputPath)
    .Select(x => new FileInfo(x).Name)
    .ToArray();
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Why don't you use a for loop instead of using foreach. In this scenario, there is no way you can get the index of the current iteration of the foreach loop.

The name of the file can be added to the string[] in this way,

private string[] ColeccionDeCortes(string Path)
{
  DirectoryInfo X = new DirectoryInfo(Path);
  FileInfo[] listaDeArchivos = X.GetFiles();
  string[] Coleccion=new string[listaDeArchivos.Length];

  for (int i = 0; i < listaDeArchivos.Length; i++)
  {
     Coleccion[i] = listaDeArchivos[i].Name;
  }

  return Coleccion;
}
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I would not use an array in this case. Instead I would use a StringCollection.

using System.Collections.Specialized;

private StringCollection ColeccionDeCortes(string Path)
{

DirectoryInfo X = new DirectoryInfo(Path);

FileInfo[] listaDeArchivos = X.GetFiles();
StringCollection Coleccion = new StringCollection();

foreach (FileInfo FI in listaDeArchivos)
{
  Coleccion.Add( FI.Name );
}
return Coleccion;

}

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This is how I add to a string when needed:

        string[] myList;
        myList = new string[100];
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            myList[i] = string.Format("List string : {0}", i);
        }
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