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I have a plain old CLR object which is essentially a wrapper for two entity framework objects, I'm doing this so I can pass this wrapper object to a strongly typed view in the MVC framework. My foo wrapper class is very simple:

public class FooWrapper
{
    public FooWrapper(Foo f, Bar b)
    {
        this.FooObject = f;
        this.BarObject = b;
    }

    public Foo FooObject { get; private set; }
    public Bar BarObject { get; private set; }
}

What I have so far for my ListFoosWithBars function is as follows:

public IEnumerable<FooWrapper> ListFoosWithBars(int userID)
{
    IEnumerable<Bar> tempBar = ListBarsByUserID(userID);
    IEnumerable<FooWrapper> results = (from f in _entities.FooSet
                                       join b in tempBar on f.ID equals b.foos.ID
                                       select new FooWrapper(f, b));
    return results;
}

This doesn't work because evidently LINQ to Entities doesn't support parametrized initialization, an exception is thrown that says just that: "Only parameterless constructors and initializers are supported in LINQ to Entities." I was wondering if there is another way to achieve this same result?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

IF you add a parameterless constructor to your FooWrapper and then use object initialization instead, like so:

public IEnumerable<FooWrapper> ListFoosWithBars(int userID)
{
    IEnumerable<Bar> tempBar = ListBarsByUserID(userID);

    IEnumerable<FooWrapper> results = (
        from f in _entities.FooSet
        join b in tempBar on f.ID equals b.foos.ID
        select new FooWrapper()
        {
            FooObject = f, 
            BarObject = b
        });

    return results;
}
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3  
Had the same thing typed, you win. –  AdamSane Sep 17 '09 at 17:48
    
Perfect, thank you! –  Graham Conzett Sep 17 '09 at 17:57

Ok, but what if you want FooObject and BarObject to be readonly? It seems a bit backwards to me that they negate the ability to use a constructor on the object.

I can see a lot of people breaking good encapsulation practices in order to utilize object initialization in this scenario.

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Why aren't you using the .AsEnumerable()? In that way, you won't need to create a parameterless constructor and that is what you want.

Your code was almost good. Change it to this:

public IEnumerable<FooWrapper> ListFoosWithBars(int userID)
{
    IEnumerable<Bar> tempBar = ListBarsByUserID(userID);
    IEnumerable<FooWrapper> results = (from f in _entities.FooSet.AsEnumerable()
                                       join b in tempBar on f.ID equals b.foos.ID
                                       select new FooWrapper(f, b));
    return results;
}

I had the same problem today. I had a class with one parameter constructor. This constructor filled a private readonly field which was returned by a property only with a get and not with a set.

share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the best solution to this issue! –  Silas Hansen May 30 '12 at 21:34
6  
I would just be very careful with this approach though, you are basically negating the benefits of the Entity framework by calling AsEnumerable. Once you specify that you are effectively bringing all the records from the FooSet Table and then performing the join locally in memory. Just think about the performance implications when you have thousands (or millions) of records. –  Santo Aug 8 '12 at 22:41
    
@Santo Agreed, this approach causes grinds my machine to a halt with a LINQ statement over 16 tables, takes about five minutes to return a result. Had it almost instantaneous with a comparable SQL statement. –  wonea Oct 24 '12 at 10:55
    
Nicely explained , thanks ! –  Bruno Ligutti May 15 '13 at 21:33

Try a different initialization:

public class FooWrapper
{
    public FooWrapper() { }

    public Foo FooObject { get; set; }
    public Bar BarObject { get; set; }
}


public IEnumerable<FooWrapper> ListFoosWithBars(int userID)
{
    IEnumerable<Bar> tempBar = ListBarsByUserID(userID);

    IEnumerable<FooWrapper> results = (
        from f in _entities.FooSet
        join b in tempBar on f.ID equals b.foos.ID
        select new FooWrapper 
        {
            FooObject = f,
            BarObject = b
        });

    return results;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for omitting () after type name in initializer. :) –  Craig Stuntz Sep 17 '09 at 18:42

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