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Displaying the composer version like:

$ composer.phar -V
Composer version e33aebc

Shows some string I assume of is a shortened git SHA-1 hash.

Is that version number/string unambiguous for now and in the future?

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Reference: composer.phar /.lock with build revision information –  hakre Jan 26 '13 at 11:03
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2 Answers

The version ID there is the Git revision ID, so yes it is (almost) unambiguous. The ID you mentioned relates to the revision after this change: https://github.com/composer/composer/commit/e33aebc

So, why did I say "almost"? - well it's jus the shortned SHA-1 used by git, so in theory it might happen tht two revisions share that small part of the sha key, but that's quite unlickely to happen.

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Well, one said unlikely and then it happens. I don't fear a true clash of the full hash BTW, because you need to resolve that one in the repository first anyway ;) - But this is only seven hex-digits long. I wonder why. Probably it will be automatically extended if needed? –  hakre Jan 18 '13 at 16:22
    
7 hex digits still gives 268435455 different values, having sha-1 being equally distributed this still gives a quite low risk of conflicts given the amount of to be expected commits over the next years. –  johannes Jan 18 '13 at 16:32
    
Taking the first 7 digits is also a common practice. When I started with git I found some site with the probability maths, can't find it now .. only references calling it a common practice, i.e. wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Git#A_word_on_commits –  johannes Jan 18 '13 at 16:39
    
This email might shed some light: lkml.org/lkml/2010/10/28/264 –  hakre Jan 18 '13 at 20:21
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Now it is. Use full hash in version information of dev phars, fixes #1502.

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