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I'm starting studying CodeIgniter and, before going deeply into it, I'm considering and analysing some scenarios.

One of these is about the assets (css/js/img) folder: googling around, the main trend is to put the assets folder in the root, at the same level of /system and /application; given the case that I could have more than one application (as stated here: http://ellislab.com/codeigniter/user-guide/general/managing_apps.html), each one with its own assets folder, the most logical solution for me is to put the /assets folder INTO /application folder - this seems also more "portable"

Ok, now the question: how do I reference the assets files into my views? If /assets folder is in the root, I read around that I can reference ie. the .css file like this: <?=base_url()?>/assets/css/style.css But what if the /assets folder is inside /application, since I can't use <?=base_url()?>/application/assets/css/style.css ?

Thanks in advance!

@Brendan: Hi Brendan, thanks for the comment; I'll explain better the "portability" starting from the issue of having more than one application (/application1, /application2, etc., that is my starting point of the answer; no problem if I've only one application, but I'm prefiguring the scenario of having more than one)

Having the /assets folder at the same level as index.php means that I could end up having many subfolders as are my applications, like /assets/application1, /assets/application2, etc.

If I'd ever have to move the applicationX folders to some other computer I should remember to move also the corresponding /assets/applicationX folder; if I'd ever rename the /applicationX to /newnameX, I should remember to rename also the /assets/applicationX to /assets/newnameX to don't get a mess

Having /assets INTO /application saves me from all these problems, that's my thinking; the idea of a helper is nice, as states this article that I just found and that seems to solve exactly the questions I'm asking: http://heybigname.com/2009/11/23/managing-assets-with-codeigniter/

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2 Answers

Define "portable".

If your CodeIgniter application is set up correctly--that is:

  • system and application folders below the web root
  • $config['base_url'] is correct (full domain including protocol, i.e. http://www.example.com)

Then you should be placing your assets folder in the same directory as the front controller (index.php). This configuration is no less "portable" (I'd argue it is moreso) than having assets inside of the application folder. If your application directory is below the web root (it really should be), you won't be able to load assets from that folder without a "proxy" script to load the file for you. At best that would mean more load on php, at worst (in the case of a poor implementation) a security risk.

In short: assets really doesn't belong in application. The beauty of PHP/CI, however, is that you can still do it if you so desire (but application must be above the web root).

Also, you can pass your file paths into the base_url() function as so:

<?php echo base_url('assets/css/style.css'); // output: http://www.example.com/assets/css/style.css ?>
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I know this is an old question, but I have written an article some time ago with some point targeting this problem. I liked the way Ruby on Rails laid out the Assets folder, and I created a setup will mimics this.

See my blog here: http://www.stefandunn.co.uk/blog/custom-codeigniter-helpers-stolen-from-ruby-on-rails/

It's the last point I made.

With this, you can refer to your asset files using simple php code:

javascript_tag('main.js');
image_tag('logo.png', array('class'=>'logo', 'id'=> 'logo'));
stylesheet_tag('main.css');
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