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Its always said its better to use a collection object as below

1) List st = new LinkedList();

2) Map mp = new HashMap();

Than

3) LinkedList st = new LinkedList();

4) HashMap mp = new HashMap();

I agree by defining as above (1,2) I can reassign the same variable (st,mp) to other objects of List, Map interface

But Here I cant use the methods that are defined only in LinkedList, Hashmap which is correct as those are not visible for List, Map . (Please correct me if am worng)

But if am defining a object of HashMap or LinkedList, I want to use it for some special functionality from these.

Then Why is it said the best way to create a collection object is as done in ( 1,2 )

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5 Answers 5

Because most of the time you don't need the special methods. If you need the special methods, then obviously you need to reference the specific type.

Lesson for today: Don't blindly apply programming principles without using your own brain.

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6  
+1 for lesson of the day –  mre Jan 18 '13 at 16:39

But if am defining a object of HashMap or LinkedList, I want to use it for some special functionality from these.

In that case, you should absolutely declare the variable using the concrete class. That's fine.

The point of using the interface instead is to indicate that you only need the functionality exposed by that interface, leaving you open to potentially change implementation later. (Although you'd need to be careful of the performance and even behavioural implications of which concrete implementation you choose.)

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I agree by defining as above (1,2) I can reassign the same variable (st,mp) to other objects of List,Map interface

Yes, it's a general practice called programming against interfaces.

But Here I cant use the methods that are defined only in LinkedList, Hashmap which is correct as those are not visible for List,Map . (Please correct me if am worng)

No, you are right.

But if am defining a object of HashMap or LinkedList, I want to use it for some special functionality from these.

Then Why is it said the best way to create a collection object is as done in ( 1,2 )

This isn't the best way. If you need to use specific methods of those classes you need the reference to the concrete type. If you need to use those collections from a client class that is not supposed to know the internal implementation than it's better to expose only the interface.

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Through interfaces you define service contracts. As you say, should you change the lower implementation of a given interface, you can do it flawlesly without any impact on your current code.

If you need any particular behaviour of the particular classes it's absolutely right to use them. Maps usually extend the AbstractMap class that itself implements Map, making the subclasses inherit those methods.

Of course, many classes throw IllegalOperationException on some defined methods of the Map interface, so that implementation type change is not always flawless (but in most cases, it is, because each map has a particular asset that makes it the most appropiate choice for a given context).

Use the type that suits you, not the one that someone says it's the correct one. Every rule has exceptions.

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Because if you use the interface to access the collections, you are free to change the implementation. Eg use a ArrayList instead LinkedList, or a synchronized version of it.

This mostly applies to cases where you have a Collection in a public interface of the class, internally i wouldn't bother, just use what you need.

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