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I made a simple test program to play around with C++11 threads.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <thread>
using namespace std;

void tee(int civ)
{
    for(int loop=0; loop<19; loop++, civ++)
    {
        civ = civ%19;
        cout << loop << "\t" << civ << endl;
        this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::milliseconds(300));
    }
}

void koot()
{
    while(true)
    {
        cout << ":) ";
        this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::milliseconds(300));
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    thread saie(tee, atoi(argv[1])),
        kamaa(koot);
    saie.join();
    kamaa.join();

    return 0;
}

It works fine as long as I supply command line arguments, but if I don't, it crashes. How can this be solved? I tried checking the argument count, and if they existed, to no avail.

EDIT: I had to add this line:

if(argc < 2) return 1;
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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Griwes, Sam Miller, Lightness Races in Orbit, EdChum Jan 18 '13 at 20:32

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You are using agv[1], which will be NULL if no command-line arguments are given. How did you do the checking? –  Angew Jan 18 '13 at 17:48
    
Because argv[1] will be NULL? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 18 '13 at 17:48
    
Um... Because you're using argv[1] in your call to saie, and if you don't provide it it's NULL? –  Ken White Jan 18 '13 at 17:49
    
Why will it be NULL, guys? Seems to me that its value, such as it is, will be completely unspecified, and attempting to access it will invoke undefined behaviour. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 19:03
1  
OK, because [C++11: 3.6.1/2] says: The value of argv[argc] shall be 0.. Note then, OP, that this does not mean that argv[2] and so on will also be NULL. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '13 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It crashes because you are accessing

argv[1]

which would hold a command line argument (other than the program's name) if there was one. You should check whether argc is greater than 1. Why greater than 1? Because the first command line argument is the name of the program itself. So argc is always greater than 0. And indexing starts at 0. So if argc == 1, only argv[0] is valid.

#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  // no need to check argc for argv[0]
  std::cout << argc << " " << argv[0] << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Apparently I needed this: if(argc < 2) return 1; –  Tiivi Taavi Jan 18 '13 at 17:52

argv[1] is null, causing a crash in the call to atoi(). Note that array indices in C++ are zero-based!

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because you don't check if argc > 1 and you try to access argv[1]

way to solve this is first check if argc > 1 and then access argv[1].

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

    if(argc > 1){
    thread saie(tee, atoi(argv[1])),
        kamaa(koot);
    saie.join();
    kamaa.join();
   }
    return 0;
}

Points to remember:

  1. argc is by default 1. This is the argument counter that holds the no. of arguments passed to the program. By default, its 1 because the program gets the executable's name(and path)

  2. argv holds the array of NULL terminated character arrays(or strings). argv[0] will always hold the name of the executable.

  3. never assume user will always enter the arguments. and always do a bounds check while accessing argv or any array in the future.

share|improve this answer

Try the following code instead:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if(argc < 2) {   cout<<"No command line arguments found\n Aborting!\n"; return 1;}
    else         {   thread saie(tee, atoi(argv[1])),kamaa(koot);}
    saie.join();
    kamaa.join();

    return 0;
}

You are trying to access a command line argument argv[1] which is not present. It is always better to check if the command line argument exists or not.

share|improve this answer
1  
argc is always equal to or greater than 1 –  Aniket Jan 18 '13 at 17:58
    
typo.. should've been argc < 2 –  Ashwath Jan 18 '13 at 18:01

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