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I have created an Enum to define certain actions. Programming against a external API I am forced to use an Integer to express this action. That's why I have added an integer instance field to my Enum. This should be d'accord with Joshua Bloch's Effective Java, instead of relying on ordinal() or the order of the Enum constants using values()[index].

public enum Action {

    START(0),

    QUIT(1);

    public final int code;

    Protocol(int code) {
         this.code = code;
     }
}

I get an integer value what from the API and now I want to create an Enum value out of it, how can I implement this in the most generic fashion?

Obviously, adding such a factory method, will not work. You cannot instantiate an Enum.

Action valueOf(int what) {
     return new Action(what);
}

Of course, I can always make a switch-case statement and add all the possible codes and return the appropriate constant. But I want to avoid defining them in two places at the same time.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're going to have a lot of them, you can use a HashMap<Integer, Action>:

private static final Map<Integer, Action> actions = new HashMap<>(values().size, 1);

static {
    for (Action action : values())
        actions.put(action.code, action);
}

// ...

public static Action valueOf(int what) {
    return actions.get(what);
}

This is useful if you're going to have a large number of Action values since the HashMap lookup is O(1).

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You could initialize the map with the right size: new HashMap<>(Action.values().length, 1); (it won't make a difference if there are not many values but it does not cost anything doing it). –  assylias Jan 18 '13 at 18:48
    
@assylias Funny, I have looked into the source code and the constructor actually ignores the load factor: Note that this implementation ignores loadFactor; it always uses a load factor of 3/4. This simplifies the code and generally improves performance. –  Max Rhan Jan 18 '13 at 18:55
    
I did not know that-interesting. –  assylias Jan 18 '13 at 19:06
1  
@assylias Huh, ok. I agree, have looked it up on an external source, there it is implemented. No idea then, I just followed to the source code hitting F2 in Eclipse. Maybe it is some Android speciality. –  Max Rhan Jan 18 '13 at 23:17
1  
@MaxRhan Yep, you're right, it's definitely like that on Android. Interesting, I'll have to remember this. –  Brian Jan 19 '13 at 2:44
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If you are sure that your codes will always be sequential and starting from 0 then the most efficient option would be

public enum Action {
    START(0),

    QUIT(1);

    public static final Action[] ACTIONS;
    static {
      ACTIONS = new Action[values().length];
      for(Action a : values()) {
        ACTIONS[a.code] = a;
      }
    }

    public final int code;

    Protocol(int code) {
         this.code = code;
     }
}
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I would personally keep it simple (YAGNI) and use the ordinal value but:

  • I would keep the logic within the enum to make sure outside code does not know about that implementation detail and does not rely on it
  • I would make sure I have a test that fails if something breaks (i.e. if the numbers don't start from 0 or are not incremental)

enum code:

public enum Action {

    START(0),
    QUIT(1);
    private final int code;

    Action(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return code;
    }

    public static Action of(int code) {
        try {
            return Action.values()[code];
        } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("not a valid code: " + code);
        }
    }
}

test

@Test
public testActionEnumOrder() {
    int i = 0;
    for (Action a : Action.values()) {
        assertEquals(a.getCode(), i++);
    }
}

If you change QUIT(1) to QUIT(2) for example, the test will fail. When that happens, you can use a HashMap or a lookup loop.

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Interesting. I would not favor using code that is more likely to break due to changes over code where this is not true. But I haven't put thought into choosing the former one and backing it up with a test case. –  Max Rhan Jan 18 '13 at 18:52
    
@MaxRhan If you fear that the test might not be run, you can even include the check in a static initializer block so that it is run every time the class is loaded. Anything that breaks the design will be spotted very soon. –  assylias Jan 18 '13 at 20:14
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