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I always forget how to do this in Perl. Here's my script:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;

my @got = getpwent();
my $username    = ${[getpwent()]}[0];

print Dumper( @got );
print "username is [$username]\n";

... and here is the output it produces ...

$VAR1 = 'root';
$VAR2 = 'xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx';
$VAR3 = 0; 
$VAR4 = 0;
$VAR5 = ''; 
$VAR6 = '';
$VAR7 = 'myhost root';
$VAR8 = '/root';
$VAR9 = '/bin/bash';
username is [bin]

... and my question is, why is username equal 'bin' instead of 'root'?

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1  
Post the code for getpwent(). –  Jack Maney Jan 18 '13 at 18:22
    
The Dumper method takes a reference to the array as such \@got. –  squiguy Jan 18 '13 at 18:23
3  
@Jack Maney - getpwent is a builtin function –  mob Jan 18 '13 at 18:26
2  
Also, ${[getpwent()]}[0]; would more commonly be written (getpwent())[0]. –  Jim Davis Jan 18 '13 at 18:34
    
@mob - Huh. So it is. My mistake. –  Jack Maney Jan 18 '13 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It iterates over users; you're calling it twice, and getting information for two users.

$ perl -E 'say $foo while $foo = getpwent()'
root
daemon
bin
sys
sync
...
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1  
Beat me by 4 seconds. –  mob Jan 18 '13 at 18:33

Repeated calls to getpwent return different rows in your password file (or whatever source of user information getpwent is using).

root is the first user listed in your password file, bin is the second.

Call endpwent to reset the iterator and replicate your previous calls to getpwent:

for (0..2) {
    print scalar getpwent(), "\n";
}
print "-- reset --\n";
endpwent();
for (0..3) {
    print scalar getpwent(), "\n";
}

outputs (YMMV)

SYSTEM
LocalService
NetworkService
-- reset --
SYSTEM
LocalService
NetworkService
Administrators
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